On Mon, Nov 21, 2016 at 3:47 PM, MZMcBride <z...@mzmcbride.com> wrote:

> And if we disregard any application of common sense, then yes, you could
> argue that a technical code of conduct is needed. When you consider the
> actual context, however, it becomes pretty clear that this is unnecessary
> bureaucracy. The repeated concerns about outsized influence by
> Wikimedia Foundation employees have largely gone ignored.
>
i think so too. common sense replaces a lot of rules and policies :) donors
money is imo better invested in writing good software supporting the
mission than making policies. we have enough policies and rules of all
kind, being a burden when contriuting, especially to newbies. i get a
chicken skin of fright when i read the collaboration teams plans of putting
bureaucracy into software, talking about "the largest wikis have the most
complex workflows". the most complex and stable workflow i know is in
wikinews, and we all know that wikinews died. i would really love if
"collaboration" would be the main topic, not "process" and "rule". this is
just so against the basic "wiki" idea, our core value.

best
rupert
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