Thanks for the info.

Lee Badman | Network Architect | CWNE #200
Information Technology Services
206 Machinery Hall
120 Smith Drive
Syracuse, New York 13244
t 315.443.3003   f 315.443.4325   e lhbad...@syr.edu w its.syr.edu
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
syr.edu
________________________________
From: The EDUCAUSE Wireless Issues Constituent Group Listserv 
<WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU> on behalf of Robert Mathews (OSIA) 
<math...@hawaii.edu>
Sent: Friday, April 6, 2018 5:52:38 PM
To: WIRELESS-LAN@LISTSERV.EDUCAUSE.EDU
Subject: Re: [WIRELESS-LAN] GDPR


On 4/6/2018 12:52 PM, Lee H Badman wrote:

Interesting- I couldn’t tell if rules were different between EU residents vs 
visitors. I’m sure a lot of campus legal departments/lawyers are busy right now 
trying to figure it all out. I’ll be curious to see how operations for US 
colleges abroad are specifically impacted from the network and IT perspectives.

Lee Badman | Network Architect

Certified Wireless Network Expert (#200)
Information Technology Services
206 Machinery Hall
120 Smith Drive
Syracuse, New York 13244
t 315.443.3003   f 315.443.4325   e lhbad...@syr.edu<mailto:lhbad...@syr.edu> w 
its.syr.edu
SYRACUSE UNIVERSITY
syr.edu

Lee and All:

What follows is an observation, and a warning, for all involved with 
institutional matters relating to the GDPR.

Privacy as a general matter, is a vastly mis-understood subject.  And, the GDPR 
is going to fastly become a guidepost and standard in many parts of the world.  
 The GDPR is already in the mix of laws among EU Member States;  GDPR related 
law-enforcement begins on this May 25th.   Many parties (including lawyers on 
both sides of the Atlantic) are befuddled by, and are unprepared for the GDPR, 
even to the foundational extent to be able to properly interpret the impact on 
institutions and respective users.

With regard to ANY ONE specific institution in the US or Canada, a quick rush 
to a NYT bestseller on the GDPR -- I suspect, will be a deeply deficient move.  
I would submit to you that EACH INSTITUTION is likely to encounter use needs, 
and cases, which will have to be expertly evaluated (by competent legal 
counsel... you would be surprised as to how many are inexpert or plainly 
unaware....) before any set of policies or practices are decidedly put into 
place...    In the US specifically, the community of practitioners who are 
associated with the International Association of Privacy Professionals (IAPP), 
could be a resource in this respect.

I have just completed the assembly of a series of peer-reviewed articles for a 
Special Issue on Privacy [ 
https://link.springer.com/journal/12553/topicalCollection/AC_ff270572e9e891b9433b11a6eb9c14da/page/1
 
],<https://link.springer.com/journal/12553/topicalCollection/AC_ff270572e9e891b9433b11a6eb9c14da/page/1>
 for the International Journal of Health and Technology (WHO - Springer 
Nature).   There are many valuable articles in the Special Issue that are 
publicly available (Open Access), and those that are not available, can easily 
be accessed through your academic institution's library.  One of the many 
submissions, is from Giovanni Buttarelli (EDPS) [ 
https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12553-017-0198-y 
].<https://link.springer.com/article/10.1007/s12553-017-0198-y>

GDPR will definitely effect US institutions and those within them.  It is 
important to NOT take this matter lightly, given our mis-adventures with 
"Privacy Shield", and other such matters.

Cheers,
Robert.
--
[cid:part4.06020204.07040806@hawaii.edu]
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