I wonder how accurate this article is. I designed part of this network as the 
third or fourth deep sub-contractor through Lockheed Martin. As far as I can 
remember there was no design to cover the whole County such that you could 
drive down the road anywhere and have it work. I did do a lot of point to point 
work and created areas where emergency response teams would have a wi-fi cloud 
at pre-determined staging areas. Sounds like marketing is getting the best of 
things here. I could be wrong, maybe I was not aware of the complete network 
design.



Thank You,
Brian Webster

-----Original Message-----
From: Marlon K. Schafer (509) 982-2181 [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
Sent: Monday, August 08, 2005 11:51 AM
To: wireless@wispa.org
Subject: [WISPA] Fw: [TVWHITESPACE] NYT on WiFi and Police Use



Subject: [TVWHITESPACE] NYT on WiFi and Police Use


> FYI - Mike Marcus
> ======
>
> August 7, 2005
> When Pigs Wi-Fi
> By NICHOLAS D. KRISTOF
>
> HERMISTON, Ore.
>
> This is cowboy country, where the rodeo is coming to town, the high 
> school's "kiss the pig" contest involves a genuine hog, and life seems 
> about as high-tech as the local calf-dressing competition, when teams race 
> to wrestle protesting calves into T-shirts.
>
> But Hermiston is actually a global leader of our Internet future. Today, 
> this chunk of arid farm country appears to be the largest Wi-Fi hot spot 
> in the world, with wireless high-speed Internet access available free for 
> some 600 square miles. Most of that is in eastern Oregon, with some just 
> across the border in southern Washington.
>
> Driving along the road here, I used my laptop to get e-mail and download 
> video - and you can do that while cruising at 70 miles per hour, mile 
> after mile after mile, at a transmission speed several times as fast as a 
> T-1 line. (Note: it's preferable to do this with someone else driving.)
>
> This kind of network is the wave of the future, and eastern Oregon shows 
> that it's technically and financially feasible. New York and other leading 
> cities should be embarrassed that Morrow and Umatilla Counties in eastern 
> Oregon are far ahead of them in providing high-speed Internet coverage to 
> residents, schools and law enforcement officers - even though all of 
> Morrow County doesn't even have a single traffic light.
>
> The big cities should take note, said Kim Puzey, the general manager of 
> the Port of Umatilla on the Columbia River here. "We'd like people to say, 
> 'If they can do it out in the boondocks with a small population, that 
> model can be applied to highly complex areas,' " he said.
>
> Mr. Puzey, who says wireless broadband is central to the port's 
> operations, argues persuasively that broadband is just the next step in 
> expanding the national infrastructure, comparable to the transcontinental 
> railroad, the national highway system and rural electrification.
>
> Indeed, we need to envision broadband Internet access as just another 
> utility, like electricity or water. Often the best way to provide that 
> will be to blanket a region with Wi-Fi coverage to create wireless 
> computer networks, rather than running D.S.L., cable or fiber-optic lines 
> to every home.
>
> So if the first step was to get Americans wired, the next step is to make 
> them wireless.
>
> Two pioneers in that process are Portland, Ore., and Philadelphia, which 
> are both moving toward citywide Wi-Fi Internet access. Consumers will 
> still have to pay for broadband, but only about half as much as they do 
> now.
>
> Still, Portland and Philadelphia won't have their systems in place until 
> next year. Meanwhile, the system in eastern Oregon covers a larger 
> geographic area, is free for consumers and has been up and running for 
> more than a year and a half.
>
> One reason it sprang up here is that a nearby Army depot contains chemical 
> weapons, so there is special concern about what would happen if a cloud of 
> nerve gas escaped from the depot. That fear helped provide a pot of 
> federal money to underwrite safety systems.
>
> Usually, the police and fire agencies communicate just by radio, but 
> Hermiston decided to go with a public-private partnership that established 
> a Wi-Fi network. The police chief, Dan Coulombe, showed me the wireless 
> computers that all police officers now carry. They can download data and 
> receive images from video monitors - and, if nerve gas ever escaped, 
> display the cloud's direction and speed.
>
> Fingerprint readers are now being added to these portable devices so a 
> police officer can almost instantly run a person's fingerprint through a 
> multistate database. And if there's a report of a burglary, the police 
> rushing to the scene can download floor plans of the building, live images 
> from video monitors and information about the alarm system.
>
> The wizard behind the system is Fred Ziari, an Iranian immigrant and Wi-Fi 
> pioneer who runs a high-tech company in Hermiston and Portland, EZ 
> Wireless. Mr. Ziari contracted with the local authorities to provide the 
> Wi-Fi service, which lets consumers piggyback for nothing.
>
> Hermiston is already starting to introduce WiMax, the next generation of 
> technology after Wi-Fi, offering much higher speeds and greater range.
>
> Other American towns need to follow Hermiston, not necessarily in holding 
> "kiss the pig" contests, but in ensuring broadband Internet access as 
> reliably as they do water or electricity. The fact is, unless you're a 
> cowboy here in eastern Oregon, you're behind the times. 

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