John,

Well said. I fully agree.

Tom DeReggi
RapidDSL & Wireless, Inc
IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband


----- Original Message ----- From: "John Scrivner" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "WISPA General List" <wireless@wispa.org>
Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2006 7:07 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] TV band issue.


I always considered the log periodic to be a type of yagi. I guess my naming could be wrong but the fact is that log periodics do act as directional broadband antennas. They could be made to work as data radio antennas for inband television band data radios. As I stated earlier there are other factors that could make this not such a good option. Obviously the use of a rotor is not going to work well for a point source Internet connection. You do not want Mom turning the rotor for Days of Our Lives when Dad is trying to Google search for Home Beer Making Kits. Also the impedance of a log periodic antenna is either 300 ohms or 75 ohms depending on the design. Most are 300 ohm. The transmission lines used to carry television signals are generally rated at either 300 or 75 ohms. The radios would presumably be 50 ohms. This means that some impedance matching device would be required to mate an existing television antenna system to a data radio. This is not a huge issue but it does show that this is not just a plug and play deal. There are some issues to address when considering using an off-air television antenna in our hopeful future systems where we get to use unused television channel space.

I would suggest we move along to bigger issues now like how to get the channels to begin with. We have a big hurdle to cross there. I doubt we see a federal government move to give us this space as unlicensed. I do not think it will happen now. I would also like to see a license system for this spectrum as long as it did not discriminate against the smaller operators. Uncle Sam thinks we should sell off all of our public assets to the highest bidder in massive geographic chunks so no small interests have a chance at buying into this opportunity. It is beyond all reason to me that something as finite and scarce as spectrum should be sold outright when there will eventually be none left unless you hold a license. This is the largest fleecing of America I have ever seen. It makes the Savings and Loan bailout look like a lost receipt for lunch at tax time.

Spectrum is just like land. We should have free market access to spectrum for everyone just like our ability to buy land. Uncle Sam wants to sell off half of your home state at a time to anyone with enough cash. Heaven forbid that the other people who might have a use for it in that area cannot once it is gone. This is just plain wrong. It is such a waste and so backward.

What is really frightening to me is that even educated people who ought to know better just cannot understand what is at stake here. The economic future of this country rides on our ability to maintain a leadership role in Internet and data communications. Wireless communications are a big part of this world-wide Internet revolution and we are being held at bay by the interests of the NAB and other fat cats who want nothing more than to aid the failing landline ILECs and broadcasters who now use off-air television channels as nothing other than a registration system for who gets to be on which cable system. Off-air television is barely used by anyone. The idea that the NAB has some birthright to this spectrum is starting to seriously grate on my nerves. They need to step back and look at what is being left unused here. It is outrageous how this is being handled. The wool has been completely pulled over the eyes of America.
Scriv




Ron Wallace wrote:

To demure, aren't off-air TV antennas a combination of yagi and log-periodic, forming a broadband multi-element device. A hybrid of sorts??

>-----Original Message-----
>From: John Scrivner [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
>Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2006 11:55 AM
>To: 'WISPA General List'
>Subject: Re: [WISPA] TV band issue.
>
>There is no physics to back up that using a directed television yagi
>antenna would be a bad thing. With that said I do not think using
>existing TV antennas would be very practical. The 75 ohm impedance for
>a 50 ohm radio is a problem. This would require a 50 to 75 ohm balun
>connector at the radio to make it work. Existing television yagi
>antennas will easily transmit as well as receive within the television
>band without any noise problems. If you ever used an old television
>tower rotor you know the antennas are fairly directive in nature. I
>would likely always install my own antenna unless the customer just
>happened to have a great outdoor setup in place. I would not like to
>have customers complaining that they lost their Internet when someone in
>the house turned the rotor.
>:-)
>Scriv
>
>
>
>Tom DeReggi wrote:
>
>>> AND many homes already
>>
>> have the antennas we need installed!!!!
>>
>> Don't forget, TV was a broadcast technology, withthe antenna's
>> puirpose to receive only.
>> Not sure I'd want to use those existing TV antenna, for transmitting.
>> Talk about creating noise in the spectrum.
>>
>> Tom DeReggi
>> RapidDSL & Wireless, Inc
>> IntAirNet- Fixed Wireless Broadband
>>
>>
>> ----- Original Message ----- From: "Marlon K. Schafer (509) 982-2181"
>> <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
>> To: "FCC Discussion" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
>> Cc: <wireless@wispa.org>; <isp-wireless@isp-wireless.com>
>> Sent: Tuesday, January 31, 2006 11:02 AM
>> Subject: [WISPA] TV band issue.
>>
>>
>>> Hi All,
>>>
>>> You may be interested in this.
>>>
>>> http://www.jhsnider.net/telecompolicy/ First article, click on the
>>> word "here". It's in word format.
>>>
>>> I think this is something that we need to be working on. WISPA is to
>>> some extent, but it's a big issue against powerful opponents and
>>> those working on this issue are already time crunched big time.
>>>
>>> Please be aware, if we can get TV bands or even TV band white spaces
>>> opened up we'll have tree and house penetration abilities. AND many
>>> homes already have the antennas we need installed!!!!
>>>
>>> This may well be the biggest issue for the wisp industry since
>>> unlicensed in the first place.
>>> laters,
>>> Marlon
>>> (509) 982-2181 Equipment sales
>>> (408) 907-6910 (Vonage) Consulting services
>>> 42846865 (icq) And I run my own wisp!
>>> 64.146.146.12 (net meeting)
>>> www.odessaoffice.com/wireless
>>> www.odessaoffice.com/marlon/cam
>>>
>>>
>>>
>>> --
>>> WISPA Wireless List: wireless@wispa.org
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>>
>>
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