A fictional future president we've not heard of yet"  :)

I told you it was FICTION, george...

:)



North East Oregon Fastnet, LLC 509-593-4061
personal correspondence to:  mark at neofast dot net
sales inquiries to:  purchasing at neofast dot net
Fast Internet, NO WIRES!
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----- Original Message ----- 
From: "George" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: "WISPA General List" <wireless@wispa.org>
Sent: Thursday, February 02, 2006 2:12 PM
Subject: Re: [WISPA] It's been a long road


> Who is James Hart, "President of WISPA" ?
>
> George
>
>
>
> "James Hart, president of WISPA, who had been influential and forceful in
> Washington DC revealed to me in a phone conversation, that he and WISPA
were
> expecting the closure or sale of about 99% of its member's businesses.
> WISPA had been initially supportive of the UKA goals, but the universal
> service requirments killed all support.  But it was too late."
>
> Mark Koskenmaki wrote:
> > the following is fiction... but could it happen?
> >
> > =========
> >
> > Dateline, Washington DC,  August 11, 2010
> >
> > Ed Duerkson,  National Small Business Monthly
> >
> > Today,  just in time to boost her presidental aspirations, Senator
Clinton
> > and the rest of the Senate voted in the Universal Information Rights
bill.
> > "This sweeping legislation is the most important act to pass Congress
since
> > the passage of the Civil Rights Acts in the sixties.   Defining access
to
> > information as a right, just like the right to vote and the right to
free
> > speech will revolutionize our society."
> >
> > As a regular writer of this column and having followed this story for a
few
> > years, I think it's time to recap just how we got to where we are.
> > Researching the history of internet providers has been a fascinating
study.
> > The earliest access to what was a closed system started back in the
middle
> > 90's, when a few ISP's started allowing modem access to what was a very
> > academia oriented network.
> >
> > Time online was expensive, but everything online was free.   And not a
> > regulation in sight.
> >
> > By the late 90's, dialup was common, and faster internet connections
were
> > becoming sought after, and DSL (Digital Subscriber Line) technology was
> > slowly rolled out in urban areas by most telephone companies, which
allowed
> > the dramatically faster - but slow by today's standards - access of at
first
> > a fraction of a megabit, and then growing to several megabit speeds.
Of
> > course, all access previous to common DSL was all by small business.
Then,
> > the phone companies saw the light and began thier own internet access
> > offerings.   They owned DSL for the most part, and moved into the
wholesale,
> > or commodity, dialup business.   Striking down the telecommunications
act by
> > the courts a few years later gave them a leg up on gaining market share.
> > Most of this market share seemed to be at the expense of ISP's.
> >
> > By the middle of this last decade,  DSL was available to well more than
half
> > of the population - and with the advent of commodity priced equipment,
it
> > rapidly spread to around 80%.   Cable was hot, as well, providing 'net
> > access to large areas and bundled with tv and eventually, VOIP
offerings.
> >
> > Then, fiber slowly began to be deployed.   With good speeds,  and a
> > permanence of presence, fiber finally began to penetrate urban areas.
But
> > with high costs of deployment, somewhat costly maintenance, fiber was
> > relatlively expensive for residential use.
> >
> > So, you say, what happened to those areas NOT covered by DSL and fiber?
> > Some had nothing other than dialup.   Wireless providers grew
expansively in
> > the early and middle part of the decade.   No license costs,  almost no
> > regulation, and the advent of inexpensive and relatively fast wireless
> > equipment and technologies made wireless a bright star.   It, too,
however,
> > had moderate infrastructure costs, and it did not cover everywhere.
> > Satellite was a somewhat less than stellar, but very universally
available
> > version of broadband.   Performance issues kept it from being much
besides
> > the "last available alternative".
> >
> >>From a small business advocacy perspective, Wireless was the key.
Anyone
> > could get into the business, the cost of deployment varied dramatically
from
> > a couple normal paychecks, to millions of dollars, and so it became a
bright
> > star for small business, in the communications sector.
> >
> > How this changed?   Well, that's a subject of debate.   Some say it was
> > inevitable "maturing".   I disagree.  Many industries "mature" and leave
a
> > vibrant mix of both small and large operators.   In this case, it was a
case
> > of regulation and some interesting moves by industry and politics.
> >
> > First, regulators moved to regulate Internet services.   WISP's began to
> > lobby the FCC for spectrum, the kind required to offer near universal
> > services.   They won this battle.   Almost.   They won, with late 2006
rule
> > by the FCC that granted sub 1Ghz spectrum for the provision of broadband
> > services.   With over 150Mhz of spectrum available, the industry was
> > ecstatic.   But with an intenst lobbying by a coalition of telephone
> > companies, cellular companies, and equipment manufacturers - with the
lead
> > operators of each being Verizon, SBC, Motorola, and joined by Microsoft
and
> > a group of WiMax producers and even the ARRL, intense pressure and the
> > specter of a lot of lawsuits prompted the FCC to reverse its decision,
and
> > that spectrum space was changed to "licensed" and sold at auction.
> >
> > This seems to be the key.   Lobbying produced results and WISP's gained
the
> > ability to tap USF funds to provide internet and VOIP phone service to
rural
> > areas.   In fact, a few actually bought out a couple small areas from
> > independent phone companies and a short lived moved by larger phone
> > companies to divest themselves from small money-losing areas.   These
were
> > relatively successful initially.
> >
> > But with this move, new regulations came into existence.  WISP's could
no
> > longer offer any other service than an internet connection, or else they
> > were classified as and subject to full telecommunications regulations.
> > Those that did found themselves required to sell access to thier network
to
> > thier competition.   One particular happening, for instance, was when
Qwest
> > won the right to use the independent network's last mile to offer
bandwidth.
> > After arguing for almost 3 years that independents were entitled to be
given
> > access to the last mile at a discount equal to 50% of the retail price
of
> > the services offered by the owners of the network.   Qwest then offered
a $5
> > package that included unlimited VOIP and long distance AND internet
access
> > to residential customers.   Small operators could not afford to build
out
> > universally if they offered anything other than net access only.  And
then
> > USF funds became restricted to only universal access providers.
> >
> > Almost without exception, this ended the operations of multiple-service
> > WISP's.
> >
> > This brings us to today.   The last two years have been an intense
effort by
> > Microsoft, SBC, and others, by a newly formed consortium of politicians,
> > academics, social activists, and industry players like Motorola and
> > Alvarion, known as "Universal Knowledge Access" or "UKA", to define
internet
> > access as a universal service - requiring provision to every business
and
> > residence in the country.
> >
> > With the passage of this bill, internet access has become the telephone
> > access of the last century.   Only those who can provide it universally
are
> > allowed to operate.  Basically, each state will have a framework of
> > regulations, almost mirroring that which defined telephone services up
until
> > now.   The FCC has federal oversight and is expected to handle any
> > regulatory issues.
> >
> > In about three months, the FCC and each state will start a registration
> > process, where each provider will define the territory it covers, and
will
> > have approximately 18 months to reach every address within the
registered
> > area.   Rates for access will be set by the same tarriff mechanism that
sets
> > rates within each state for telephone company services.   USF funds will
> > continue to be available to subsidize rural buildouts.
> >
> > James Hart, president of WISPA, who had been influential and forceful in
> > Washington DC revealed to me in a phone conversation, that he and WISPA
were
> > expecting the closure or sale of about 99% of its member's businesses.
> > WISPA had been initially supportive of the UKA goals, but the universal
> > service requirments killed all support.  But it was too late.
> >
> >>From a small business perspective... Internet access by small business
had a
> > 17 year life.  Not even long enough to retire from.   And now its gone.
> >
> > Will it be deregulated in the future?   Maybe.   But don't look for it
too
> > soon.   The specific  regulatory processes taking place to provide
universal
> > service actually don't plan on reaching universal access for nearly 10
> > years.   Any plans to disrupt that will definitely face insurmountable
> > political opposition.
> >
> >
> > RIP
> > Internet Service Providers
> > 1995 - 2011
> > "We loved them well"
> >
> > Next month, in my column on industry trends, we're going to look at
> > evolution of operating system diversity in the marketplace, and how the
> > imposition and retraction of legally mandated information file formats
> > affected OS and application development.   We'll also examine the
suprising
> > rise of small players over the last two years in the operating system
> > market.
> >
> > ==============
> >
> > I honestly am beginning to question my move into the WISP business...
seems
> > there's hardly a soul out there that sees danger in jumping on the
"regulate
> > me and give me money" bandwagon...
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> >
> > North East Oregon Fastnet, LLC 509-593-4061
> > personal correspondence to:  mark at neofast dot net
> > sales inquiries to:  purchasing at neofast dot net
> > Fast Internet, NO WIRES!
>
> --------------------------------------------------------------------------
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