At one time I sold by the byte but only to the high bandwidth users
that I would carry otherwise. I've said since 1999 that one day
bandwidth will be by the byte. I think this could be the case if once
carriers bandwidth was better than anothers. Then someone would pay
for it.
-RickG

On 1/25/07, John J. Thomas <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:

But, the model will work if you bill by the bytes....

If Joe is paying $40 per month for 6 Gig and gets throttled at 6 Gig, then he 
has a disincentive for keeping going. If he is paying $40 for unlimited access, 
he has no reason to slow down.

Charter cable is doing 10 meg down/1 meg up in some markets for like $99 per 
month, how can you compete with that?

John

>-----Original Message-----
>From: Travis Johnson [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]
>Sent: Wednesday, January 24, 2007 07:59 PM
>To: 'WISPA General List'
>Subject: Re: [WISPA] Service Offerings,        By Speed or All You Can Eat? 
Was:       Advanced Bandwidth Management
>
>No... I don't think that model works... because Joe Surfer sees how fast
>this last movie downloaded and decides to grab 3 more while he's at it...
>The model of "the customer will use what they are going to use and then
>get off" is not true... imagine if Joe Surfer figures out he can
>download the movies AND still surf, check email, etc. at the same time?
>Then he can just leave it downloading 24x7. :(
>
>Travis
>Microserv
>
>RickG wrote:
>> Sorry guys for hijacking the thread but this hit a chord...
>>
>> I've sold bandwidth in all sorts of ways but the most prevalent is by
>> speed which is the  way  am currently doing it. My question is this:
>> What if you played the "cable game" and just sell  all you can eat?
>> Would that not free up your network more quickly for everybody else?
>> Example: Joe Surfer downloads movies on demand but is too cheap to buy
>> your highest speed offering. So, he buys your slowest speed and ties
>> up your network much longer. Just  looking for some opinions here ;)
>>
>> Thanks!
>> RickG
>>
>> On 1/24/07, Travis Johnson <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>>> OR, we could stop playing the Cable Co. and Telco "games" with their "up
>>> to 3meg" and "up to 7meg" connections for $34.95 and just start selling
>>> what they get.
>>>
>>> We started selling 512k, 1meg, 1.5meg and 2meg connections (up and down,
>>> guaranteed speed 24x7) about 3 years ago. It was the best thing we ever
>>> did... people get what they pay for, and when they need more, they buy
>>> more. No games, no "burstable" speeds, etc.
>>>
>>> Make your customers pay for what they need and use.
>>>
>>> Travis
>>> Microserv
>>>
>>> Blair Davis wrote:
>>> > We sell mainly to residential users and to some small businesses.
>>> >
>>> > We are quite rural, and my cost for a T-1 is $450 per month.  My
>>> > pending fiber hookup is $1100 per month for 5Mbit.
>>> >
>>> > A bit ago, a business customer's new IT consultant complained that the
>>> > 256Kbit committed rate for $60 a month was over priced.  He demanded a
>>> > 1Mbit committed rate and no price change.  I explained this was not
>>> > possible.  He was quite nasty and told me he was recommending that the
>>> > customer find a new ISP.  I, fed up with his big city attitude, told
>>> > him to go right ahead.  He said to come pick up the gear on this
>>> > Friday.  Although, I might have lost my temper a bit and used some
>>> > words that the FCC doesn't permit on the phone......
>>> >
>>> > After he was quoted $600 per month for a T1, (and $9500 install), and
>>> > a 3 month lead time, he called me back...
>>> >
>>> > He decided that my offer of 1Mbit committed rate (6am-6pm, Mon-Fri)
>>> > and a 256Kbit committed rate at other times) for $250 a month was a
>>> > damn good deal......
>>> >
>>> > The point of this, is that, for many customers, pricing and bandwidth
>>> > expectations are being driven by the cheap bandwidth in the large
>>> > cites....  Out here in the real world, it don't work that way.....
>>> >
>>> > The other point is, that with a good mix of residential and business
>>> > customers, and a little creative thinking, one can match their usage
>>> > patterns to minimize ones peak bandwidth requirements while still
>>> > providing the 'fast, snappy feel' that the users prefer....
>>> >
>>> > Just my $.02
>>> >
>>> >
>>> > J. Vogel wrote:
>>> >
>>> >> I would suspect that the customer (as is the case in much of the
>>> world,
>>> >> not necessarily in the limited
>>> >> world you may operate in) does not want to, or in many case could not
>>> >> pay for such a pipe. In many
>>> >> areas of the US, especially rural, bandwidth is extremely expensive.
>>> >> Customers do not want to pay
>>> >> close to $1k / month for their residential connection to the
>>> internet,
>>> >> yet the customer would like to
>>> >> access the internet at speed approaching 1.5 mbps (or even faster)
>>> >> whenever they can. In such a case
>>> >> it makes sense, is good business practice, and not at all
>>> unethical to
>>> >> sell customers shared bandwidth.
>>> >>
>>> >> In cases such as these, the question posed by the OP is a valid
>>> >> question, and deserves an answer
>>> >> other than one which implies that they may be doing something they
>>> >> should not be. The world is a big
>>> >> place. It is good to get out and see parts of it you may not have
>>> seen
>>> >> lately.
>>> >>
>>> >> John
>>> >>
>>> >> Matt Liotta wrote:
>>> >>
>>> >>
>>> >>> Have you thought about selling the customer a pipe that works for
>>> any
>>> >>> and all traffic at the speed the customer signed up for as
>>> opposed to
>>> >>> deciding for the customer?
>>> >>>
>>> >>> -Matt
>>> >>>
>>> >>>
>>> >>>
>>> >>
>>> >>
>>> >>
>>> >
>>> >
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