I just went through a round of doing this exact same thing. In the end, I'm
not sure it was worth the time. I think I'll just buy new units from now on.
As they say YMMV!
-RickG

On Wed, Nov 18, 2009 at 3:26 AM, Matt Larsen - Lists <li...@manageisp.com>wrote:

> I've spent the last two days going through my "left for dead" pile of
> Tranzeo CPQ/5a/SL5/SL2 radios in the shop.    Out of 41 radios, I have
> been able to get 35 of them resurrected, which was very surprising.
>
> To be fair, about 6 of them didn't appear to have any problems at all, a
> firmware update and a signal level test took care of them.
>
> One of the most common failures is the dead ethernet port.   In some
> cases, the port was legitimately dead.   However, a bad radio card will
> also make the ethernet port look like it is dead and cause the board to
> malfunction.   I had a box of old CM9 cards that had tested out okay, so
> I started dropping them into the "dead" boards and they came right back
> to life - and are also now 5/10/20mhz channel capable.   I marked the
> bad boards and wireless cards and threw them away.
>
> Between the units that had dead cards (with good boards) and dead boards
> (with good cards) I was able to combine the working parts into several
> good units.
>
> 4 of the units had blown ethernet on Port A, but not on Port B.  The 5A
> and TR-6000 series radios have two ethernet ports, and if the main one
> is blown out, the secondary one will often still work.   I marked the
> dead ports, upgraded the firmware and put them back in the usable pile.
>
> A couple of the n-connector units had broken pigtails internally.   That
> was easy to fix.
>
> Two radios had bad ethernet jack/jumpers to the board.   Those were also
> easy to fix.
>
> Units manufactured after 2006 or that have spent time in a really hot
> climate (like Texas) come apart a lot easier.   I have two indispensible
> tools, a long flathead screwdriver and a roofing knife that has one
> short sharp hooked edge and a longer sharp cutting edge.   I can usually
> pry an edge open with the screwdriver, and then just drive it on down
> the sides until it splits open.   The cutting knife will easily cut
> through the newer units, but needs some help from the screwdriver on the
> older units.
>
> Putting them back together is pretty simple, although I purposely make
> them slightly ugly.   We have used several different types of sealant to
> "glue" the plastic front to the metal backplate, and a choice had to be
> made.   Some types will seal together great, but are nearly impossible
> to get back apart later without tearing the plastic up.   Others will be
> fine for a while, but lose their stickiness and then the face plate
> falls off.   I decided to keep the maintainability and also keep the
> faceplate on by laying down silicone sealant on the plastic face, and
> then drilling four holes on the corners and putting a small
> bolt/washer/nut in the corners.   This makes them look somewhat
> "Frankensteinish" which is probably appropriate - but they are easy to
> maintain with this setup.
>
> Some of the shells/antennas are going to have different boards put in
> them.   Some are going to get WRAP boards with StarOS and a pigtail and
> will become repeaters.   Some are getting WAR1 boards with StarOS and
> high powered 2.4 cards and will be used as CPEs for difficult installs
> or power users.    Some are getting Mikrotik RB112 boards and 2.4cards
> and will be used as CPEs - but apparently only in places where we aren't
> running 10mhz channels since Mikrotik seems to have problems in CPE
> mode.  I really hope that there is a resolution to that Mikrotik problem
> soon.
>
> After dissecting a bunch of them, I have a lot of respect for the
> Tranzeo units.   At least 60% of the failures were bad cards, and those
> were easy to fix.  Most of the board failures had something to do with
> lighting or power surges, which I would not expect many to survive.
> Only one of the units showed any kind of water damage, and that could
> have been an installer's fault.   They are tough units that survive both
> hot and cold temperature extremes, and the enclosures are decent.   I
> still have another 45 or so to go through.   Should be fun.
>
> Matt Larsen
> vistabeam.com
>
>
>
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