And when the FCC comes knocking, you can always point to the other guy 
and say "but he's worse!"

Or not...


Randy


On 6/23/2010 3:59 PM, Jack Unger wrote:
> That's a basic question.
>
>   From one consultant to another... the maximum legal access point EIRP
> on 5.8 GHz is +36 dBm.
>
> What individual WISP operators actually do in practice is anybody's guess.
>
> The majority of WISP operators are mature, responsible people. They
> strive to do the right thing and to obey the law to the best of their
> ability.
>
> A minority of WISP operators (unfortunately, our industry has its share
> of "bad apples") take pride in their disdain for anybody or anything and
> seem to revel in telling other people to go to hell.
>
> Best of luck to you,
>                                 jack
>
>
>
> Fred R. Goldstein wrote:
>    
>> I'm just a little confused about some of these nice-looking access
>> points.  The UBNT Rocket M5, for instance, can put out +27 dBm.  It
>> plugs *right into* a nice 19dB sector antenna.  Okay, the smaller,
>> 120 dB sector is only 16 dB.  Now math is not really my thing but I
>> get a total ERP there of +43 to 46 dBm.
>>
>> FCC Rule 15.247 states that the maximum transmitted power output for
>> digitally-modulated intentional radiators in the 5725-5850 MHz band
>> ("ISM") is 1 watt, and the maximum antenna gain is 6 dBi.  Each
>> additional dB of antanna gain means one less dB of power.  So the
>> maximum ERP is 4 watts (+36).
>>
>> Point-to-point is an exception in that specific band; it is allowed
>> unlimited antenna gain.  But "point-to-multipoint systems,
>> omnidirectional applications, and multiple co-located intentional
>> radiators transmitting the same information" are under the cap.
>>
>> So am I correct in assuming that everybody who uses the Rocket M5, or
>> any other similar PtMP system for subscriber access, turns the
>> transmitter power REAL low (~+20 + feedline loss), in order to keep
>> the ERP below +36?  Or are we assuming that since you're technically
>> only transmitting and receiving to one end user at a time, it's really PtP?
>>
>> SkyPilot's legal hack, of course, is to have eight 45 degree sector
>> antennas and only use one at a time, so it is legally PTP even with
>> +42 EiRP. And with advanced 11N 4x4 beamforming antennas, something
>> like that will become relatively easy.  But we're not quite there
>> yet.  Thoughts?
>>
>>    --
>>    Fred Goldstein    k1io   fgoldstein "at" ionary.com
>>    ionary Consulting              http://www.ionary.com/
>>    +1 617 795 2701
>>
>>
>>
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>>
>>      
>    

-- 
Randy Cosby
Vice President
InfoWest, Inc

435-674-0165 x 2010

http://www.infowest.com/

"As knowledge increases, the verdict of yesterday must be reversed
today, and in the long run the most positive authority is the
least to be trusted." - Hugh Nibley



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