>From a usability/accessibility point a view.

The most common separator used in such circumstances (and therefore that
most expected by screen-reader users) is the vertical bar.

i.e. IF you add extra characters for accessibility, use the ones they are
familiar with (usability).

Addition: apparently the vertical bar character was preferred by
screen-reader users because, whilst it is quite "wordy", there is
virtually no other use for it, so very little opportunity for confusion.



On Thu, May 8, 2008 2:32 pm, Rahul Gonsalves wrote:
> On 08-May-08, at 2:33 PM, Designer wrote:
>
>> The WAI validator complains [...]
>
> Do you have to build a WAI-validating site? If you don't have to, I
> would suggest ignoring that guideline, as it doesn't necessarily
> enhance accessibility for visitors. I would suggest using :focus to
> provide visual cues - most modern screen readers are able to
> differentiate between adjacent links without difficulty.
>
>> You can use a list as someone mentioned, you can also add a hidden
>> character. [...]
>
>
> @Mike: Adding extra characters just increases the auditory clutter
> that screenreader-users have to experience. While your method is a
> good one if WAI-valid is necessary, I must respectfully disagree with
> it on accessibility grounds :-).
>
> Best,
>   - Rahul.
>
>
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