This straight OL does not work from a pure XHTML 1.0 Strict perspective
unless your legal documents conform to the browsers' default list numbering
scheme.
The *'type'*  attribute is not valid in XHTML 1.0 which really annoys me to
no end, since I work for a county government. The numbering in a legal
document is an integral part of the pages' content and should not be left to
the determination of the CSS, because once you separate the CSS from the
XHTML the list's numbering is not valid and much of the use and meaning for
the document is lost.

I am not sure, but I expect that HTML5 has a similar issue. Correct me if I
am wrong. I hope I am.

Jim

On Wed, Aug 26, 2009 at 08:16, Jason Grant <ja...@flexewebs.com> wrote:

> This isn't a problem at all. It's a simple thing to do in HTML. Example:
> <ol>
>      <li>Blah Blah</li>
>      <li>Blah Blah</li>
>      <li>Blah Blah
>           <ol>
>                <li>Blah Blah</li>
>                <li>Blah Blah</li>
>                <li>Blah Blah
>                       <ol>
>                               <li>Blah blah</li>
>                               <li>Blah blah</li>
>                               <li>Blah blah</li>
>                       </ol>
>                </li>
>           </ol>
>      </li>
> </ol>
>
> Thanks,
>
> Jason
>


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