Hi Lucien,

In my opinion, this is the best structure for yes/no options:

<p>Do you...?</p>
<label><input type="radio" name="ans" value="yes"> Yes</label>
<label><input type="radio" name="ans" value="no"> No</label>

Cheers,
Greg



On Thu, Jun 3, 2010 at 11:41 PM, nedlud <ned...@gmail.com> wrote:

> Hmm.
>
> I hadn't considered the wording of the actual question to be so important.
> But I can sure see your point.
>
> The full questions in the form is "Do you require an interpreter?"
> This is followed by: "If so, what language?"
>
> I am porting a paper based for onto the web, and the paper based version
> has explicit check boxes for "yes" and "no". But it occurred to me that on
> the web, I could reduce the two check boxes down to one. "Tick the box if
> you require an interpreter." Then dynamically insert the "what language"
> question if they answer yes. (Yes, an obvious problem with all this is that
> the form is all written in English. I guess the client is assuming an
> English speaker is helping the Non-English speaker with the form).
>
> I often look for the simplest way to represent thing, an in this case, a
> single check box can easily represent both the "yes" and "no" states
> (checked or not checked). But is this the best UX? Are people more
> comfortable with explicit yes/no choices? Even when it might be more verbose
> than absolutely necessary?
>
> Lucien.
>
>
> On 4 June 2010 13:29, John Unsworth <john.unswo...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Hi Lucien,
>>
>> The first thing that occurs to me regarding the semantics of the
>> action is what is the Yes/No proposition in regards to, and that this
>> might provide a clearer notion as to what to do.
>>
>> By this what I mean is, in the first instance so far as semantic mark
>> up is concerned it would appear that a radio button is exactly what
>> you would use. Here it is a case of either on or off. Yes or no.
>>
>> However the first thing I thought of, and I suppose this is in more
>> regards a UI/UX consideration is the design pattern we see with
>> webmail clients and the "Remember me" check box.
>>
>> So returning to the first point, are you simply asking for a Yes/No
>> action or like the "Remember me" function a call to action with an
>> Option Yes or Option No result? In which case your question might be
>> rephrased by improving the microcopy of your markup. Instead of "Do
>> you..?" the semantics are improved by fixing the proposition, ie;
>> "Remember me for 2 weeks" - tick on = Yes, un-ticked = No, or another
>> example, rather than "Would you like to receive our email newsletter?"
>> radio buttons Yes/No, checkbox pre-selected followed by "Uncheck if
>> you would not like to receive our email newsletter."
>>
>> In addition to my thoughts I had a look into the Robert Hoekman Jr
>> book "Designing the Obvious" and in Chapter 16 about Simplifying Long
>> Forms he cites an example that begins with a series of Yes/No
>> propositions that given further consideration can be better addressed
>> by better directed questions and ultimately checkboxes. If you have a
>> Safari Books Online account you can access this book, or at the least
>> here is a link to his presentation at Web Directions in 2008;
>> http://www.webdirections.org/resources/robert-hoekman-jr/ which
>> contains links to his book on Amazon and an introduction to his
>> approach.
>>
>> But I'll try and quickly summarise it for you. Original form starts -
>> "Do you...have any Group Medical, Dental or Vision coverage..with Acme
>> Insurance" = Radio Button Yes/No.
>> Second iteration - "Do you...have any Group Medical, Dental or Vision
>> coverage..with Acme Insurance" = Radio Button Yes, then checkbox's for
>> Medical, Dental, Vision - Radio Button No.
>> Third iteration - Do you...have any Group Medical, Dental or Vision
>> coverage..with Acme Insurance" = checkbox's for Medical, Dental,
>> Vision - implied is if you don't check any, you would of selected No.
>>
>> So to sum up, before it's a question of which is the best markup to
>> use, what is the actual end result of this action and can it be
>> handled a better way?
>>
>> Cheers,
>> John Unsworth
>>
>>
>>
>> On 4 June 2010 12:29, nedlud <ned...@gmail.com> wrote:
>> > I have a web form I'm building and there is a simple yes/no question in
>> it.
>> > I got to wondering what the best semantic  mark up for this is? Does
>> anyone
>> > have any good UI/UX suggestions?
>> > My three ideas were...
>> > Two radio buttons for "yes" and "no"...
>> > <p>Do you...?</p>
>> > <label for="ans-yes">Yes</label><input type="radio" name="ans"
>> id="ans-yes">
>> > <label for="ans-no">No</label><input type="radio" name="ans"
>> id="ans-no">
>> > A single check box. A tick implies a "yes" answer while no tick implies
>> > "no"...
>> > <p>Do you...?</p>
>> > <input type="checkbox" name="ans" id="ans">
>> > Or a selection list with a "yes" and a "no" answer...
>> > <p>Do you...?</p>
>> > <select name="ans" id="ans">
>> >    <option value="yes">Yes</option>
>> >    <option value="no">No</option>
>> > </select>
>> > Which is the preferred way? Or can you suggest a better way?
>> > Lucien.
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