Well I can't mention who I am referring to in a public discussion group but
I know of more than a few who insist that ie has it right and are stubborn
on this beyond all reason.

I recall what things were like ten years ago - 12 years ago I have the same
mindset but then my eyes were opened - I too have a good memory :)

dinosaur developers do very much live in our times; as do systems with a
lifespan that far exceed what they were intended for

One such dd that I refer to created a CMS, impressive in its elegance too,
but it focused on ie use only to the extent that it only worked in IE - the
very same could have been achieved in better browsers and would have been
all the better for it too

consistent abysmal performance rather than graded browser support - I know
which I prefer

 I remember 25 years ago. You'd have hated that.


25 years ago I was using Acorn  Eletron playing Killer Gorilla from tape

- S



On 14 June 2010 16:59, st...@stevegibbings.co.uk
<st...@stevegibbings.co.uk>wrote:

> It's not dinasaur developers. It's systems that were never intended to have
> the lifespan they have. The web was a very different place a decade ago. See
> I remember 25 years ago. You'd have hated that.
>
> Sent from my iPhone
>
> On 14 Jun 2010, at 16:34, Sam Sherlock <sam.sherl...@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>  That's an industry education project in itself.
>
>
> indeed it is and Microsoft was forced to inform windows users of the choice
> of browsers a little while ago
>
> BBC Click reported that one XP user worried that this was the result of
> malware installed on his machine.
> Often users ignore system messages anyway
>
> there are a few things at play here with these ie dinosaurs
>
>    1. The industry is still quite young and its users are not that
>    knowledgeable of choices and whats to be gained
>    2. Humans are reluctant to make changes even when the offer is free of
>    charge - humans fear change; change requires effort on behalf of the user
>
> 'we have dedicated systems that reply on IE6'
>
>
> surely *rely upon *dinosaur users exist in dinosaur environments - these
> systems are created by retro thinking developers who still despite  all the
> evidence to contrary think that IE browsers have the jump on other browsers
> or feel it more important for the system to be consistently abysmal across
> browsers  rather than acceptable in IE6/7 and better in ie8 and vastly
> better in everything else.
>
> Ninja squads need to invade the premisses of ie6 users and install
> something better!
>
> using ie should be considered a health & safety issue
>  <http://icant.co.uk/ie6-amelie/>http://icant.co.uk/ie6-amelie/
>
> - S
>
>
>
> On 14 June 2010 14:46, Stephen Gibbings < <st...@stevegibbings.co.uk>
> st...@stevegibbings.co.uk> wrote:
>
>>
>
>
>
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