On 13/02/06, Anders Blomdell <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
Dmitry Adamushko wrote:
>
>  > >
>  > >   irq K  | ----------- | ---o    |   // Linux only
>  > >   ...
>  > >   irq L  | ---o        |         |   // RT-only
>  > >   ...
>  > >   irq M  | ---o------- | ---o    |   // Shared between domains
>  > >   ...
>  > >   irq N  | ---o---o--- |         |   // Shared inside single domain
>  > >   ...
>  > >   irq O  | ---o---o--- | ---o    |   // Shared between and inside
> single
>  > > domain
>  > >
>  > > Xenomai currently handles the K & L cases, Dmitrys patch addresses
> the N
>  > > case, with edge triggered interrupts the M (and O after Dmitry's patch)
>  > > case(s) might be handled by returning RT_INTR_CHAINED | RT_INTR_ENABLE
>  > >
>  >
>  > As you pointed out recently, using this combo for M (and thus O)
> might also be
>  > unsafe, e.g. causing some implementation to send eoi twice or more
> (and the second
>  > time while hw IRQs are off and the second IRQ is still pending) if
> more than a
>  > single domain ends the current interrupt. This said, I've never tried
> that
>  > actually, but this does seem a bit optimistic to always expect a
> proper behaviour
>  > in this case (basically, it all depends on what "ending" the
> interrupt means hw-wise).
>
>
> Just to be sure I've got the things more or less clear. I feel there are
> some holes in my understanding of the irq handling stuff, mainly hw-wise.
>
> x86 + i8259A.
>
> In this case, .end handler does nothing more than enabling the IRQ line.
> The "eoi" is sent in .ack right after disabling the IRQ line.
>
> Let's suppose we have the "M" case ("O" makes no difference here).
>
> When the ISR handler in Linux domain gets control :
>
> - the IRQ line is ON (it was already .end-ed in the primary domain in case
>   of XN_ISR_ENABLE | XN_ISR_CHAINED ).
>
> ===
>   Actually, it's possible to set IPIPE_PASS flag for
>   the primary_domain.irqs[THIS_IRQ].control
>   when THIS_IRQ is shared across domains. This way, there is no need
>   to call propagate_irq() in xnintr_irq_handler(). Ok, it's not
>   that important so far.
> ===
>
>   This is not how it happens when the IRQ is only handled in the
>   Linux domain. But the ISR is still serialized (need not to be
>   reentrant) because do_IRQ() takes care of it (by means
>   of RUNNING and PENDING flags).
>
> So, I suppose, it's possible to use XN_ISR_ENABLE | XN_ISR_CHAINED in that
> case?
Yes, but only if you disable interrupts from the Linux device (i.e. via its
control registers, not via the APIC), otherwise the RT-handler will spin since
the interrupt will never get deasserted. Then you are faced with finding some
place to reenble those interrupts right after the Linux interrupts-handler has run.

Thanks. I'm just missing what really happens between PIC and hw devices at the time of CPU <--> PIC communication. Now it becomes clearer, nevertheless I have to find some good hw-related overview (tried but failed so far).
 


--
Best regards

Anders Blomdell


--
Best regards,
Dmitry Adamushko
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