Tentang anak-anak pondok pesantren yang dilarang membaca koran/majalah dan
menonton TV, dulu saya pernah dengar. Di ponpes yang agak modern, hanya pada
waktu-waktu tertentu mereka boleh membaca media dan menonton tv.

Yang dipertanyakan: apakah larangan itu perlu? Bukankah membaca media juga
termasuk aktivitas yang positif?


salam,

radityo

----- Original Message ----- 
From: "bung_yono" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
To: <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
Sent: Saturday, November 01, 2008 7:32 AM
Subject: [mediacare] Berita Seputar Eksekusi Amrosi dkk...


> My sons were right, says Bali bombers' mum
> November 1, 2008 - 1:00AM
> Source: ABC News, Australia
>
> None of the bombers' relatives expressed regret for the carnage.
>
> The mother of two of the Bali bombers on death row said her sons
> were right to "kill infidels", as they prepared to face firing
> squads over the attacks which killed 202 people, including 88
> Australians.
>
> Seventy-year-old Tariem spoke from her house in the village of
> Tenggulun, East Java, after working all day in her fields and
> visiting the mosque.
>
> "I don't cry. I leave it all to God," she said as convicted
> terrorists Amrozi and Mukhlas, two of her 13 children, waited for
> the firing squad in a prison on the other side of Java.
>
> "I feel that killing infidels isn't a mistake because they don't
> pray," she said as she sat on the stone floor of the family home
> surrounded by Amrozi's children and wife.
>
> "My sons are right. I wake up at 2.00am every morning to pray for
> their safety."
>
> The old woman coughed and asked for medicine as she spoke, and
> appeared confused about her sons' fate, asking: "Will my sons be
> executed?"
>
> None of the bombers' relatives expressed regret for the carnage
> unleashed on October 12, 2002, when bombs tore through packed
> tourist nightspots on the resort island of Bali.
>
> More than 160 foreign holidaymakers were killed in the blasts, one
> of the worst terror atrocities in the name of Islam since the
> September 11, 2001 attacks on the United States.
>
> Another son, Ali Imron, is serving a life sentence for his role in
> the plot.
>
> "As prayer leaders my sons would lead prayers at the mosque but they
> don't do that anymore. I miss that," Tariem said from beneath her
> prayer shawl.
>
> "I want my sons to be safe and for them not to be executed."
>
> Execution plans
>
> Authorities have said Amrozi, 47, Mukhlas, 48, and Bali ringleader
> Imam Samudra, 38, will be executed by firing squad any time from
> midnight Friday (local time) to mid-November. The family should be
> notified three days in advance.
>
> Younger brother Ali Fauzi, 38, said the family had made no plans for
> funerals and had not been informed about the executions, adding he
> was sure Amrozi and Mukhlas were on the "right path" in their final
> days.
>
> "I met both of them last month and they told me, 'don't be sad'.
> They always look so happy and I'm sure they're fighting on the right
> path," he said.
>
> Looking relaxed and beaming broadly like his older brother Amrozi,
> known as the "smiling assassin" for the grin he sported throughout
> his trial, Fauzi said the family had nothing to be ashamed about.
>
> "Do we feel embarrassed or ashamed of what they have done? No, we
> feel proud because in this world full of lies and accusations there
> are still people who are ready to fight against that," he said.
>
> "If they're executed we'll bring them back home and conduct prayers.
> Then we'll bury them at a site which we can't tell you about," he
> said.
>
> "We don't want any autopsy because although the soul is no longer
> there, the body can still feel pain."
>
> Neighbours in the village, dotted with mosques and wooden houses and
> surrounded by lush green maize and rice fields, expressed little
> sympathy for Amrozi and Mukhlas.
>
> "They should be executed because all of us should be peaceful toward
> one another," said Sulastri, a neighbour.
>
> Village chief Djarum said losing any of his neighbours was like
> losing one of his own family, but he did not support the bombings.
>
> "I'm sad but I'm not proud of what they did because Islam is a
> peaceful religion," he said.
>
> Shop-owner Mahfud Hasan said he had known Amrozi since they were
> children.
>
> "I didn't believe it until I saw him confess on TV and I was so
> shocked," he said.
>
> Students at the Islamic school where Fauzi teaches Koranic studies
> said they were banned from reading newspapers or watching television.
>
> But they were hungry for news.
>
> "I feel sad that they're being executed because they're Muslims like
> me, so I sympathise with them," said 20-year-old student Mohammad.
>
> AFP, ABC News, Australia http://www.abc.net.au
>
>
>
>
> ------------------------------------
>
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