Right.
 
OR, we might just read a book on swimming and decide we never wanted to go swimming in the first place, and save ourselves a bunch of time and money for learn-to-swim arm floats with Wally the Walrus logo ($3.99 plus shipping on ebay) and/or "lessons" we would have otherwise taken and maybe take up horseback riding or golf or something like that instead.  ;)
 
 
Regards,
Mike

 
On 8/2/06, dkotschessa <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:

--- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, "Michael Hansen" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>
wrote:
>
> With all due respect, I'm always a little leery every time someone
says
> "throw out your books" because (quite frankly) they usually read
that in a
> book somewhere themselves, found it catchy, and want to share that
wisdom
> with the world.

Exactly. It's a good way to "sound Zen", like coming up with some
cryptic phrase or putting your shoes on your head ala Joshu.

And I've never met anybody that dished out that advice that's
actually done it.

> Throwing out your books may be the best thing to do for you. Heck,
it may
> be the best thing to do for all of us, but we each need to find
that out
> ourselves. I think once we realize how futile searching for Truth
in books
> is, we put them down naturally. But nothing is forced, and if I
didn't
> exhaust my intellect in books, I'd have to do it somewhere else,
most likely
> in meditation or contemplation of the nature of things. So, what's
the
> difference?
>
> To use your swimming analogy... Sure, I might go check some books
out of
> the library. And yes, I'd probably end up going to a teacher for
help. But
> you can be damn sure *I'd* be the one moving my legs and arms and
doing the
> swimming.

And if you wanted to be a good swimmer and be able to fully engage in
it, you'd do everything you could. You might even read about
physiology, the dynamics of water, AND you'd have a teacher and spend
a lot of time with other swimmers. But more than anything else, you
would swim a lot - a whole lot. Most of the time when you're
swimming you wouldn't worry about the stuff you read in books, but
bit by bit that knowledge would guide you and people would wonder
what your secret was.

> By the way, I read that swimming analogy in a book somewhere
myself. See,
> not everything you read in books went to waste. :)
>
>
> Regards,
> Mike
>
>
>
>
> On 8/2/06, Bill Smart <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
> >
> > On Wednesday, August 02, 2006 dkotschessa wrote:
> >
> > >Have you thrown away all your books, Bill?
> >
> > No. I sit on them when I do zazen.
> >
> > What would you do if you wanted to learn to swim? Would you go
down to the
> > library and checkout a bunch of books on swimming? Or would you
locate a
> > swimming pool with a swimming teacher? Or maybe you'd just jump
in the
> > water and hope for the best.
> >
> > After a competent teacher has helped you through any fears you
have of the
> > water, helped you relax so you can discover you naturally float,
and then
> > taught you to dog-paddle a little - them maybe you could check
out some
> > books on doing the butterfly and the backstroke.
> >
> > dkotschessa? Don't we already have a dkotschessa? Guess not...
> >
> > ..Bill!
> >
> > **************************************************************
> > Scanned by VisNetic MailScan for SMTP Servers.
> > Visit http://www.deerfield.com/products/visnetic_mailscan.
> > **************************************************************
> >
> >
> >
>


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