Mayka,

 

The poem I wrote back to you was not a correction; it was a response.  I was
like a song where you sing one verse and I sing another.  In its extreme
form in the Japanese tradition this is called Dharma Combat.  It is when one
zen practitioner expresses their understanding and another responds
expressing theirs.

 

Be assured I am not at all concerned with your grammar.  Misuse of grammar
is only problematic when it prevents you from communicating well, and I
think you do very well in that area.  Also, grammar it is not important at
all in poetry.

 

Your statement below "My poem tries to transmit in a very basic way, the
truth about interbeing while yours
keeps on the individual self." is true.  The reason I wrote what I did was
because I sensed you might believe your perspective was the only or
'correct' way to represent the message of the Diamond Sutra.  What I wrote
was in direct opposition to your poem and was done to hopefully balance out
the understanding.

 

.Bill!

  

 

Mayka wrote:

Bill;
I Thank you for your feedback, but in this case I do not accept your
correction your correction as it does not correspond to the insight of
the Diamond Sutra. Zen poetry can be understood by intelectual but
through mindfulness, concentration and insight. My poem tries to
transmit in a very basic way, the truth about interbeing while yours
keeps on the individual self. However, perhaps there is an English
error and it should be reading:
I am you
You are me
we are One
Mayka



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