Dear Jody;

I like the kind of questions you're making because they push me to 
concentrate better in the practice. Thank you for this.

In response to this last post:

You say that what you're trying to understand is the goals we set to 
function in the world.

If you set a goal to function in the world you're already proyecting 
and precipitating the future.  You're mind is not anchored in the 
present moment. You don't need any goal to function in the world.  
You only need to be fully present in your being in the present 
moment.  Once you manage that the same present moment takes care of 
everything else. 

You need to understand and experience by yourself first; that the 
present moment contains the past and the future. And that this is not 
philosophy or an idea.  This is a very real fact.  Whatever you 
think, feel, do, acting... in the present moment is a consequence of 
the past. At the same time all this will determine your future 
thinking, feeling, doing acting. So, as you can see the present 
moment contains everything. And this is why is so important to know 
the way of how to stop the buzzy busy box of the mind.  So that we 
prevent more dust being accumulated leading us to so much suffering 
and confussion. Blinding us to see the Pure Mind in us. Separating us 
from the rest of life entities as it makes us prisioners in our own 
self.

You say that the MOTIVATION is important.

Again by focusing in the present moment, any motivation drops by 
itself.  One does no need motivation but being dilegent in the 
practice I'm a little embarrased to tell you this one because the 
last thing I am is being diligent in the practice.  Though I never 
loose track completely because I'm like the prodigal child returning 
back again and again to Daddy/Mammi Zen. I suppose I'm a little 
addicted to the good care of Daddy/Mammi Zen after all. 

In response to your main question below:


 "the person pursues the subject they are studying with curiousity 
and they 
> focus on what they are doing today then that is the objective but 
if they 
> are driven to crave the PhD in the future without thinking of the 
path to 
> get there then that is where the problem is?"


The way I see this here is that when one does something for the sake 
of doing it, then there is no suffering.  If one does something with 
expectations as a result then there will be suffering. In zen we 
don't think of the path because we don't have a path.  We follow the 
continuos thread of the present moment and that is what mark our path.

Let's listening to what other members have to say about your 
questions.

A Scottish Automm Leaf to you
Mayka







 
 
--- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, "Jody W. Ianuzzi" <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote:
>
> Hello Bill, Mayka and all,
> Thank you for your answers.  I do understand what you mean but what 
I am 
> trying to understand is the goals we set to function in the world.
> 
> I think I understand that is the MOTIVATION that is important.  If 
a person 
> has a driving desire to be a Phd in a subject that interests them, 
then if 
> the person pursues the subject they are studying with curiousity 
and they 
> focus on what they are doing today then that is the objective but 
if they 
> are driven to crave the PhD in the future without thinking of the 
path to 
> get there then that is where the problem is?
> 
> JODY
>



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