Last paragraph should be read as:
 
 It lost also its natural wisdom and IMPORTED all the ignorance plus 
suffering from foreign countries.  And as a result of the identity of the 
country was gradualy getting lost.

--- On Mon, 13/9/10, Maria Lopez <flordel...@btinternet.com> wrote:


From: Maria Lopez <flordel...@btinternet.com>
Subject: RE: [Zen] Other traditions
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, 13 September, 2010, 13:42


  








My very dear Bill:
 
Things hardly ever are as they appear to be under the eyes of the ones who are 
not from that culture. 
 
 
As a kind of paralelismo: I'd like to  share some thoughts based in myself 
experience in a different land as Spain. 
 
Many years ago Spain was said to be an undeveloped country in which the 
catholic church was its only religion.  We were all very fed up and wanted to 
have a country like the rest of Europe based in freedom, etc.  We wanted to be 
part of the European Union and exchange our culture and goods with the rest of 
Europe.  We didn't wanted to be so different.  We were not realicing at the 
time that we were a poor country but a country full of joy and appreciation for 
the things that really matters in life.  A Country with a fantastic human warm, 
altruism and so much necesary human qualities that keept people united as only 
one family.  Then, one day and slowly  we achieved all that we wanted to 
achieve but in the process of all that we lost our unity as only one family, 
our joy for life,  and our altruism becomes a widower.  The Country  become 
richer, had all the technology of all advanced countries but lost its 
simplicity and all that that really
 matters in life.  It lost also its natural wisdom and exported all the 
ignorance plus suffering from foreign countries.  And as a result of the 
identity of the country was getting lost.
 
 
 
 
Mayka
 
 

--- On Mon, 13/9/10, billsm...@hhs1963.org <billsm...@hhs1963.org> wrote:


From: billsm...@hhs1963.org <billsm...@hhs1963.org>
Subject: RE: [Zen] Other traditions
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Date: Monday, 13 September, 2010, 3:59


  

Mayka,

It’s quite an involved situation. Too much for me to elaborate on here.

I will just say that I have a real concern on whether the traditional social 
and cultural structure of Tibet is worth saving. It involves supporting a 
privileged religious class at the expense of the lay people. The lay people are 
kept uneducated and are taxed heavily - treated almost like slaves or at least 
serfs. Woman are kept like domestic animals. Young boys who are given to the 
religious class to use as orderlies are sometimes sexually abused and almost 
always physically abused. That's enough about that.

>From a Buddhist point-of-view, the Dalai Lama is adding or prolonging his 
>fellow countrymen's suffering by encouraging them in their fight for 
>independence. I think (my opinion only) he would serve them better as a 
>Buddhist leader to help them severe their attachments to their superstitions, 
>nationhood, language and cultural identity. It is these attachments that are 
>the root of their suffering.

Again, there are just my opinions and the reason I don't have much respect for 
the Dalai Lama.

...Bill!

From: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:zen_fo...@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf Of 
Maria Lopez
Sent: Saturday, September 11, 2010 8:08 PM
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Zen] Other traditions

Bill:

Can you elaborate where do you find The Dalai Lama hipocresy?. I'm not very 
into their political issues with China. As a person I quite like The Dalai 
Lama. And this like of him has nothing to do with him being the Dalai Lama. And 
as for his dharma I wouldn't know much except that his talking is pleasant 
thought doesn't say much of new that anyone else knows already. But I like him 
and I don't think that he's an hipocrite but someone who is in a tricky 
situation. And because of that he tries his best to explore the ways of peace. 
Perhaps through that he might appear as he was an hipocrite but he's not. He's 
a man who dreams in a world where everyone is happy and all living beings are 
safe . I know, he's genuinely like this. But of course he's a human being too. 
He's not from a western culture and because of that it might be difficult to 
understand him. But he's genuine within his own culture.
Mayka

--- On Sat, 11/9/10, billsm...@hhs1963.org <billsm...@hhs1963.org> wrote:

From: billsm...@hhs1963.org <billsm...@hhs1963.org>
Subject: RE: [Zen] Other traditions
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, 11 September, 2010, 3:49

Jody,

The only Tibetan I've heard much from is the current Dalai Lama, and I find
his hypocrisy disappointing.

...Bill!

From: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:zen_fo...@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of Jody W. Ianuzzi
Sent: Saturday, September 11, 2010 4:15 AM
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Subject: RE: [Zen] Other traditions

The impression I get is that the Buddhism practiced by the people and the
Llamas is different. The people practice a more superstitious daily
practice and the Llamas are more intellectual.

When asked if he believed in reincarnation, the Dala Lama replied that he
shared the same spiritual beliefs as the previous Dalai Lamas.

I find the honesty and humor of the Tibetans refreshing.

JODY

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