Sufism is probably more pluralistic than other traditions, except Vedanta, 
which I am not all that famililiar with -- you would have a variey of 
approaches, since it really holds no Monastic contacts where people are 
trained, rather they are schools that rise and disappear as needed . . . But 
there is meditation, talks, interviews, seclusion, vows, chanting, singing, 
work, dancing, etc . . . but there might be emphasis on some of those and not 
others.  A key feature of Sufism is to address conditioning, worldly, personal, 
and cultural conditioning . . . so, ritual and meditation could become a form 
of conditioning . . . A Sufi Master could tell someone to stop doing zazen, or 
chanting, or what have you.  The prescription in Sufism is not a prescription 
for all.  One may meditate while another is told to learn to build violins, to 
work with his or her hands.  One of the keys that many Sufi Masters have used 
is to 'be in the world but not of the world'.  So Sufism has a great emphasis 
on working with your present station, which ultimately could lead to the 
station of no station.  

Of course there are degraded superficial forms of Sufism that are all showy and 
devotional and people are all obviously spiritual.  That is another thing 
altogether. In fact, most of the Sufi Orders you would find by looking, 
googling, etc . . . would be degraded forms -- dancing, whirling, turbans, all 
that stuff.

Interestingly enough, The Gurdjieff Foundation is somewhat modeled on a real 
Sufi School.  

That has been my experience

best wishes

Kirk






-----Original Message-----
From: ChrisAustinLane <ch...@austin-lane.net>
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com <Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com>
Cc: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com <Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com>
Sent: Thu, Sep 16, 2010 6:45 am
Subject: Re: [Zen] Rumi -- Jewels of Remembrance


 

So what is Sufi training like? I assume there is no zazen, do they have dharma 
talks, retreats, interviews, work practise, meal practise? 

Thanks,
Chris Austin-Lane
Sent from a cell phone

On Sep 15, 2010, at 9:07, "salik888" <novelid...@aol.com> wrote:

> Yes, much more . . . it is like Zen Buddhism or Kabbalist or what have you . 
> . . really goofy on the outside with the commercialization that others were 
> talking about . . . but about being in the world but not of the world, which 
> gets you, well everything?
> 
> Freedom
> 
> 
> best wishes
> 
> Kirk
> 
> --- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, Chris Austin-Lane <ch...@...> wrote:
>> 
>> So people are saying that there is more to the Sufi way than the Rumi quote
>> calendars at the health food store or the Martian whirling dervishes in Kim
>> Stanley Robinson's books?
>> 
>> OK, I am listening.
>> 
>> On Sep 14, 2010 7:10 PM, <billsm...@...> wrote:
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Chris and Artie,
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> I assume from the context the Sufi use of the term ‘beloved’ is 
>> equivalent
>> to the Zen Buddhist term ‘Buddha Nature’.
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> What are your thoughts? …Bill!
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> *From:* Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:zen_fo...@yahoogroups.com] *On
>> Behalf Of *roloro1557
>> *Sent:* Wednesday, September 15, 2010 7:56 AM
>> 
>> 
>> To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
>> 
>> Subject: Re: [Zen] Rumi -- Jewels of Remembrance
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> Chris-
>> 
>> 
>> 
>> --- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, novelidea8@ wrote:
>>> 
>>> What is the beloved to you?
>> 
>> To me "th...
>> 
>> 
>> 
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> 
> 
> 
> 
> ------------------------------------
> 
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