The contents of writing arises quite naturally from  culture.  I have little 
doubt I would have had repellent beliefs if brought up in a repellent culture. 

Did you read the Third Chimpanzee? 

Thanks,
Chris Austin-Lane
Sent from a cell phone

On Sep 20, 2010, at 6:17, "ED" <seacrofter...@yahoo.com> wrote:

> 
> 
> 
> Chris,
> 
> The first line of the Tibetan version of the Dhammapada states:
> 
> "All things are of the nature of mind."    See below.
> 
> --ED
> 
>  
> 
> President George Washington "The immediate objectives are the total 
> destruction and devastation of their settlements. It will be essential to 
> ruin their crops in the ground and prevent their planting more."
> 
> Benjamin Franklin "If it be the Design of Providence to Extirpate these 
> Savages in order to make room for Cultivators of the Earth, it seems not 
> improbable that Rum may be the appointed means."
> 
> President Thomas Jefferson "This unfortunate race, whom we had been taking so 
> much pains to save and civilize, have by their unexpected desertion and 
> ferocious barbarities justified extermination and now await our decision on 
> their fate."
> 
> President John Quincy Adams "What is the right of the huntsman to the forest 
> of a thousand miles over which he has accidentally ranged in quest of prey?"
> 
> President James Monroe "The hunter or savage state requires a greater extent 
> of territory to sustain it, than is compatible with the progress and just 
> claims of civilized live . . . and must yield to it."
> 
> President Andrew Jackson "They have neither the intelligence, the industry, 
> the moral habits, nor the desire of improvement which are essential to any 
> favorable change in their condition. Established in the midst of another and 
> a superior race, and without appreciating the causes of their inferiority or 
> seeking to control them, they must necessarily yield to the force of 
> circumstances and ere long disappear."
> 
> Chief Justice John Marshall "The tribes of Indians inhabiting this country 
> were savages, whose occupation was war, and whose subsistence was drawn from 
> the forest. . . That law which regulates, and ought to regulate in general, 
> the relations between the conqueror and conquered was incapable of 
> application to a people under such circumstances. Discovery {of America by 
> Europeans} gave an exclusive right to extinguish the Indian title of 
> occupancy, either by purchase or by conquest."
> 
> President William Henry Harrison "Is one of the fairest portions of the globe 
> to remain in a state of nature, the haunt of a few wretched savages, when it 
> seems destined by the Creator to give support to a large population and to be 
> the seat of civilization?"
> 
> President Theodore Roosevelt "The settler and pioneer have at bottom had 
> justice on their side; this great continent could not have been kept as 
> nothing but a game preserve for squalid savages."
> 
> General Philip Sheridan "The only good Indians I ever saw were dead."
> 
> Source:  "The Third Chimpanzee" by Jared Diamond
> 
> http://everything2.com/title/Indian+policies+of+famous+Americans
> 
>  
> 
>  
> 
> --- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, Chris Austin-Lane <ch...@...> wrote:
> >
> Well, the interesting thing in Guns, Germs and Steel is that the conditions 
> of power arose from other more picayune conditions to do with the 
> distribution of seed sizes and domesticable animals and the orientation of 
> continents.  It really wasn't an innate lust for power either, just a simple 
> randomness as to which group of humans would develop technology first, 
> assuming all the groups are pretty similar in intelligence and motivations 
> and behavior.  
> 
> 
> --Chris
> 
> 
>  
> On Sun, Sep 19, 2010 at 11:03 AM, ED <seacrofter...@...> wrote:
> > People are people; look to the conditions to explain the differences. 
> > --Chris
>  
> Yes, and the primary condition is: Which groups have the most power.  --ED
> 
> 
> 
> 
> 

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