Bill,
 
Oriental languages do not deemphasize time or personal relationships. They rely 
on adjectives, adverbs, pronouns etc to donate time and relationships, while 
westerners inflect the words for the same purposes.
 
I am surprised to hear Thai has three tenses. Where are they?
 
Anthony

--- On Sat, 13/11/10, billsm...@hhs1963.org <billsm...@hhs1963.org> wrote:


From: billsm...@hhs1963.org <billsm...@hhs1963.org>
Subject: RE: [Zen] Re: FW: Quote from St. Thomas Aquinas
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Date: Saturday, 13 November, 2010, 3:09 PM


  



Anthony,

I know Thai’s drop subject and sometimes even object all the time, but I
thought it was just because they, like Westerners, are lazy.

For example, I could ask you: ‘Are you hungry?’, or I could just ask by
saying: ‘Hungry?’ (with a rising tone). That's just laziness, or being
casual in your speech.

I do think language does reveal the different values of culture. For
example in Thai there are only 3 tenses: past, present and future; whereas
there are many, many adjectives and pronouns that are used to specifically
identify the speaker's relationship with the one addressed. In English
there are many (27?) verb tenses and very few special pronouns. This I
think shows that Westerner's value time more than Asians; whereas Asians put
more importance on personal relationships than time.

...Bill!

From: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com [mailto:zen_fo...@yahoogroups.com] On Behalf
Of ED
Sent: Saturday, November 13, 2010 9:53 AM
To: Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com
Subject: [Zen] Re: FW: Quote from St. Thomas Aquinas

  

 
The Geography of Thought: How Culture Colors the Way the Mind ...
 
--- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Wu <wu...@...> wrote:
>
> ED,
>  
> That is not the way it is. It is too complicated to explain, but the
oriental way is different from occidental. The former is synthetic, while
the latter analytical. So you need subjects, objects, predicates, adverbials
and other nonsense to try to complete your analysis. In other words, the
westerners are more discriminating (in general).
>  
> Anthony
 
> Anthony,
> I think the reason is that Zen Masters use the Tantric principle that one
should behave in ways as if one already possesses that which one aspires to
attain; in this case, to possess a non-dualistic mind that does not
discriminate between subject and object.
> --ED
> > ED,
> > 
> > Many oriental sentences are without subjects or objects. Bill is
completely adjusted to Thailand, and the zen way. They are very grammatical
here.
> > 
> > Anthony
 
> > Bill,
> > Nice succinct answer. 
> > And, question:  Your zen-like statement in ungrammatical, without
subject or object. Is this a zen tradition of speaking, with a view to
 training the mind out of its customary dualistic mode of experiencing
reality?
> > Thank you, ED
 
> > Mayka and Ed,
> > 
> > Or perhaps Bill! would say: 'No effort, no judgment, no grasping, no
> > pushing-away, no concepts - Just THIS!
> > 
> > ...Bill!

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