Anthony,

This below is more along the lines of what I had been taught.

--ED



Note1:

"In a broader sense, vipassanā has often been used as one of two
poles for the categorization of types of Buddhist meditation, the other
being samatha </wiki/Samatha>  (Pāli; Sanskrit: śamatha).
Samatha is a focusing, pacifying and calming meditation, common to many
traditions in the world, notably yoga.

It is used as a preparation for vipassanā, pacifying the mind and
strengthening the concentration in order to allow the work of insight.
In Buddhist practice it is said that, while samatha can calm the mind,
only insight can reveal how the mind was disturbed to start with, which
leads to prajñā (Pāli: paññā, wisdom) and
jñāna (Pāli: ñāṇa, knowledge) and thus
understanding, preventing it from being disturbed again."

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vipassan%C4%81
<http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vipassan%C4%81>



--- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, Anthony Wu <wu...@...> wrote:
>
> ED,
>
> You say, "focuses it like a laser beam on any and all events or a
chosen subset of events in the here and now, to achieve specified
objectives."
>
> In my understanding, zen's mindfulness does not focus on any 'events'.
I would like to hear from Bill about this.
>
> Anthony



> The essence of the contribution of Zen to the martial arts is to be
found in:
> 7.  Right Concentration
> 8.  Right Mindfulness.
> Concentration and Mindfulness are secular activities, and yes, the
Concentration is a pre-requisite for the development of Mindfulnes; that
is, in the moment the mind takes the already-developed Concentration
and focuses it like a laser beam on any and all events or a chosen
subset of events in the here and now, to achieve specified objectives.
This capability is especially effective in the martial arts and inÂ
business strategizing.
> --ED


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