Yes, Ed.

I would say most of the languages in Zen or Chan or Buddhism are quite similar. The critical difference is in the Sitting.


Be Enlightened In This Life - We ALL Can
http://chanjmjm.blogspot.com
http://www.heartchan.org


On 12/31/2010 3:24 PM, ED wrote:


JM,

Thank you.

Different Zen teachers differ in details as to how Shikantaza should be practised. Does this sort of variation exist among Chan teachers too?

Thank you, ED

--- In Zen_Forum@yahoogroups.com, Jue Miao Jing Ming  wrote:
>

Onnly a handful I would say, Ed.

Thank you for asking.  There is a historical reason.

1898, when Japanese introduced Zen to the US in Chicago. China was ruled by emperors. From 1911 to 1949, we had all sorts of civil wars.

Then China was split into two in 1946. The mainland obsolete all religious practice by the communist. The Taiwanese were too poor to worry about spiritual well being until 1980. There are about four major Buddhist school flourished in Taiwan since 1980.

Taiwanese Buddhist did not enter the US until, I would guess, in 1990's.

We did not have public class for the American Public until 2007, because we don't have qualified English speaking teachers or materials.

Let me know if there is anything else you will be interested.

Be Enlightened In This Life - We ALL Can
http://chanjmjm.blogspot.com
http://www.heartchan.org

On 12/31/2010 , ED wrote:


JM,

Are there many Chan Masters or Chan centers or Chan temples or Chan organizations in the US?

Thanks,

--ED




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