Any CBA is better than no CBA - - even a badly skewed one. Its the same
argument for formalizing theory in economics. It makes clear what your
assumptions and logic are and makes it easy to identify areas of
agreement and disagreements between opponents on an issue. - - Bill
Dickens

>>> [EMAIL PROTECTED] 02/13/03 01:57PM >>>
One problem with applying CBA to policy formulation is ensuring
reliability
and objectivity.  Too often, CBA is manipulated for predetermined
policy
positions.  EPA once produced a Regulatory Impact Analysis that
contended
that benefits from the phaseout of CFCs are $8 trillion to $32
trillion.  In
such cases, CBA does more to confound, rather than illuminate,
rational
policy formulation.
 
Is there a practical way for policy makers to assess the reliability
and
objectivity of CBA?
 
Walt Warnick
 
-----Original Message-----
From: Driessnack, John [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]] 
Sent: Thursday, February 13, 2003 9:56 AM
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Cc: [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Subject: RE: Cost benefit analysis



In defense you can say that almost all of the weapons related 
spending
(Procurement and RDT&E budget - almost half of the budget when you
consider
the spare purchases) is accomplished having gone through some CBA in
the
process of deciding the approach to develop, procure, and then maintain
the
equipment.  An Analysis of Alternative is required along with
estimates
(actually by several layers of organizations). 

 

The other source to look at would be the Federal Acquisition
Regulations
(FAR).  This policy drives use of CBA for certain purchases.  So you
could
estimate off of this policy!  

 

jdd

 

John D Driessnack, PMP, CCE/A

Professor, Defense Acquisition University

PMT-250/352, DAU Risk/Tools Subject Matter Expert

DAWIA PM, Acq Logi, FM Level III

NE-Capital Campus, Faculty Department

Program Management and Leadership

9820 Belvoir Rd, Building 205,  Room 115B

Ft Belvoir, VA 22060-5565

703-805-4655 (DSN-655)

[EMAIL PROTECTED] 

FAX 703-805-3728

 

-----Original Message-----
From: [EMAIL PROTECTED] [mailto:[EMAIL PROTECTED]] 
Sent: Tuesday, February 11, 2003 11:16 PM
To: [EMAIL PROTECTED] 
Subject: Cost benefit analysis

 

Does anyone know how often CBA is actually used in making policy? 
What
percent of the federal budget (or state or local) has been determined
by
CBA?

Cyril Morong


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