On Tue, Mar 13, 2018 at 10:47 AM, Christopher Robin <phe...@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Tue, Mar 13, 2018 at 1:03 PM Jim Gettys <j...@freedesktop.org> wrote:
>> On Tue, Mar 13, 2018 at 12:52 PM, Dave Taht <dave.t...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> 2) Although the FCC denied the application based on having inadaquate
>>> radar reflectivity, according to their standards, the article states:
>>> "Websites dedicated to tracking operational satellites show the
>>> SpaceBees in orbits virtually identical to those specified in Swarm’s
>>> application." Ground stations can only get better.
> Note that the objections are based on a non-operating SpaceBee. I’m not
> seeing anything about one of the SpaceBees going dark for testing or not
> responding due to malfunction. So the ground stations are prob getting both
> GPS data from the sat and a fix on the radio signal to determine position.
> If both of those methods of tracking disappear, there appears to be a
> limited number of ground stations that could provide an accurate enough
> location to allow for other orbitals to made an avoidance maneuver.
> With all the noise around this launch, I haven’t been able to find info on
> expected operational lifespan vs expected orbit decay. LEO’s can still last
> for decades. The only thing I’m finding is an expected use for 6mo to 2yr,
> but not sure how long after that the Spaceebee will stay in orbit and/or be
> responsive with positional data.

The arkyd-3 was supposed to be in a 25 yr orbit with a 5 year
operational lifetime... which may outlast the company at this point.

So I'd assume this orbit (and corporate and projected lifetime) is similar.

> While just 4 of these things in space isn’t a major concern, rogue launching
> objects into space isn’t a scalable solution. This is especially true as the
> cost of launching comes down into the “cheap” startup range. These types of
> companies aren’t usually concerned 25yr impact plans, and most wont last
> long enough to be around to assist if any problems occur past that 2-3yr
> window.
> We have rules for the road, the sea, and the sky. Space needs similar
> protections. No, the FCC shouldn’t be that gatekeeper, but that’s where we
> are at until an agency is stood up with authority to handle these kinds of
> issues.



Dave Täht
CEO, TekLibre, LLC
Tel: 1-669-226-2619
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