Hello,

      First, congrats to Marcus and CCERA.

      We are working at 21 cm (1420 MHz) and find that there are at least a few 
pulsars not that far below B0329+54 (now called J0332+5434) in signal strength. 
    Indeed, one of the interesting things is that owing to scintillation 
effects, there are times when this pulsar is not as bright as some of the 
pulsars.     Of course, when this pulsar is at its best, the signal really is 
quite strong: we get a good detection after just a few turns using a 60’ dish 
and 50 MHz of BW.

       A question . . . roughly what was the integration time for the plot that 
you showed?

Sincerely,
Dan Marlow


From: Discuss-gnuradio <discuss-gnuradio-bounces+marlow=princeton....@gnu.org> 
on behalf of "mle...@ripnet.com" <mle...@ripnet.com>
Date: Thursday, December 1, 2016 at 3:41 PM
To: "Iain Young, G7III" <g7...@g7iii.net>
Cc: Discuss-gnuradio <discuss-gnuradio-bounces+mleech=ripnet....@gnu.org>, 
"discuss-gnuradio@gnu.org" <discuss-gnuradio@gnu.org>
Subject: Re: [Discuss-gnuradio] Probable pulsar observing success at CCERA


Keep in mind also that B0329+54 is really the only one within reasonable 
"reach" for an amateur in the northern hemisphere--the others are much fainter, 
although if one simply added another "gulp" of antenna every paycheque or two...

Also, you need a stable clock--I'm using an OCXO, but a TCXO will work for 
shorter observing times.  So, if you are using a dongle, you'll need to replace 
its clock.








On 2016-12-01 15:19, Iain Young, G7III wrote:
Hi Marcus,

Brilliant. I am in the middle of assembling my own radio telescope,
but had not thought Pulsar reception would be possible.

I have a couple of questions on the RF Hardware. I see from some other
updates, that the antenna is essentially sets of a 4 bay HDTV antenna.

How are you phasing them all together ? Just additive combiners with
same length coax ? What amplification are you using before feeding
them to the SDR ? Or ?


Best Regards

Iain

On 01/12/16 18:45, Marcus D. Leech wrote:
One of the many goals we set for ourselves at the Canadian Centre for
Experimental Radio Astronomy was to successfully observe
   pulsar B0329+54 before spring.  This pulsar is the only one bright
enough for a small observatory in the northern hemisphere to
   observe.

See our update:

http://www.ccera.ca/uncategorized/success-in-observing-pulsar-b032954/

The software is available via github:

https://github.com/ccera-astro/pulsar_pfb _display

No custom blocks required--just a modern Gnu Radio install, and ideally,
pyephem.

Doing this with Gnu Radio was so very easy...



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