Colin's Wackier Version:

Because the space they operate in, at the scale in which the decay operates, 
there are far more dimensions than 3. They decay deterministically in >>3D and 
it appears, to us, to be random because of the collapse of the spatial 
dimensions to 3, where we humble observers gain access to it. Same reason atoms 
jiggle in space. Same reason an electron is fuzzy. Smoothness in >>3D looks 
fuzzy to us.

Quantum mechanics is a statistical description that is predictive in 3D. It 
explains nothing.

I offer explanation, not description.

:)


From: everything-list@googlegroups.com 
[mailto:everything-list@googlegroups.com] On Behalf Of Craig Weinberg
Sent: Wednesday, 10 April 2013 1:19 PM
To: everything-list@googlegroups.com
Subject: Re: Why do particles decay randomly?



On Tuesday, April 9, 2013 7:54:27 PM UTC-4, Russell Standish wrote:
It is hard to answer this question precisely, because the large,
radioactive nuclei are very complex structures, for which exact solutions of
Schroedinger's equation cannot be obtained. Rather these things are
usually studied via Hartree-Fock approximations.

However, in loose visual terms, you can think of a neutron as being in
a superposition of states, some of which are an electron-proton pair
separated by a substantial distance. If the electron finds itself too
far from its partner proton, the weak force is too weak, and the
electric force is shielded by the orbital electrons, so the electron
escapes, becoming the beta ray. This explanation has left out an
obvious factor - an anti-neutrino must also be created as part of the
process. This is often explained as being required to preserve lepton
number - but conservation of lepton number is a somewhat ad hoc law - I
don't know the real physical reason why lepton number is conserved.

Anyway, the point of randomness is that this is a quintessential
quantum process, very closely related to the phenomenon of quantum
tunneling. Unless there exists a hidden variable-type theory
underlying QM (which basically appears to be ruled out by
Bell+Aspect), the process must be completely random.

I wonder if we looked at the behavior of cars driving on the highway, would we 
conclude that the variation in how long they travel before exiting the highway 
must be completely random? Maybe the hidden variable is that matter knows what 
it is doing?

Craig


Cheers

On Tue, Apr 09, 2013 at 05:57:11AM -0700, Craig Weinberg wrote:
> If any particle were truly identical to another, then they could not decay
> at different rates. While we see this as "random" (aka spontaneous to our
> eyes), there is nothing to say that the duration of the life of the
> particle is not influenced by intentional dispositions. Particles may
> represent different intensities of 'will to continue' or expectation of
> persistence. In this sense, organic molecules could represent a Goldilocks
> range of time-entangled panpsychism which is particularly flexible and
> dynamic. Think of the lifetime of a molecular ensemble as the length of a
> word in a sentence as it relates to the possibilities of meaning. Too long
> and it becomes unwieldy, too brief and it becomes generic.
>
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