Carl Eugen Hoyos wrote:
>How can I reproduce this?

Encode any file into *.mov and try to play it. Either from Samsung
File Manager or Samsung Video Player or from Android Gallery. (tested
on Samsung Galaxy S7, but I'm pretty sure same will happen on every
other Galaxy; If you need I can also test on Galaxy S3 and Galaxy Note
10.1 tablet and Galaxy Tab S2 tablet, which I also have in my family)

*But* if you change the file extension of the encoded *.MOV file to
*.mp4, it plays perfectly with both players.
Moreover, the Android video file scanner refuses to detect and to add
MOV files to the video library (which works great for WebM and MP4
What happens is that Android refuses to recognize MOV as a video file.
(until you install VLC for Android or some 3rd party video player)

Basically MP4 and MPEG-4-AVC, being a standard, gives some advantages.

Moritz Barsnick wrote:
> Wow, you're opening a can of worms in a world of incompatibility. Have
> you seen this (perhaps outdated, perhaps slightly incorrect) table,
> just for iOS?
> (Other sources for this information can also be found.)

Yes, I read this table and I consider it a good job. But it doesn't
mention "timebase" and not a pee about "-video_track_timescale"
Perhaps this info should be added.

What I see is that iPhone 4S (and above) as well as iPad 2+ are fairly
good. They can decode H.264 Full HD 1080p video @ 30 fps (8-bit)
perfectly. Because I require Full HD 1080p videos, older devices like
iPhone 1 or iPad 1 can't play those, and are unsupported by Apple
anyway, they can be removed from "compatible 1.0" profile.

> I think you're deep into "wrapper" land, which needs to maintain
> knowledge (and requirements like yours) outside of an encoder.

Yeah, maybe.
But I don't know how-to write a wrapper around ffmpeg. Can I extract
information like timebase and fps and duration from input video file ?

Best wishes,
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