On Tue, Jul 13, 2010 at 04:04:23PM +0200, Jeremias Maerki wrote:
> BTW, I've contacted Sally Khudairi (VP, Marketing and Publicity) to talk
> about creating a press release that puts the 1.0 release in the right
> light. It's a critical release press-wise, so I'd like to get this right.
> Not that some people expect too much. Too bad OpenSSL beat us to the 1.0
> release by about 3 months. ;-)

I propose some modifications of your short description. You wrote:

Apache FOP (Formatting Objects Processor) is a print formatter driven
by XSL formatting objects (XSL-FO by W3C). It is a Java application
that reads a formatting object (FO) tree and renders the resulting
pages to a specified output. Output formats currently supported
include PDF, PostScript, PCL, AFP and other formats. So, usually you
start with an XML file which you turn into XSL-FO describing a text
document by means of XSLT (eXtensible stylesheet language
transformations, which is the sister spec to XSL-FO).  Apache FOP then
takes that XSL-FO, formats the document and produces one of the
supported output formats (ex. PDF). It is used to produce invoices,
insurance policies, technical documentation etc. etc. Millions of
pages are produced every year by a pretty large user community around
the world.

I would like to stress the position of XSL-FO and FOP in the XML tool
chain. I also made some other smaller changes. I propose:

Apache FOP (Formatting Objects Processor) fills one slot in the chain
of XML tools: XML (e.g. Apache Xerces for parsing), XSLT (e.g. Apache
Xalan), XSL-FO (e.g. Apache FOP). XSL-FO provides print formatting of
XML files, where the XSL-FO file (the format specification) may be
created using an XSLT transformation of the XML file.

Apache FOP fulfills its role by being a print formatter driven by XSL
formatting objects. It is a Java application that reads a formatting
object (FO) tree and renders the resulting pages to the specified
output. Output formats currently supported include PDF, PostScript,
PCL, AFP and other formats.

Usually one starts with an XML file which is turned into an XSL-FO
description of the desired printed document by means of XSLT
(eXtensible stylesheet language transformations, which is the sister
spec to XSL-FO).  Apache FOP then takes that XSL-FO, formats the
specified document and produces it in one of the supported output
formats (e.g. PDF).  Apache FOP is used at to produce invoices,
insurance policies, technical documentation etc., both at enterprise
level and at personal level. Millions of pages are produced every year
by a large user community around the world. The docbook community is
an important part of the user community.

Simon

-- 
Simon Pepping
home page: http://www.leverkruid.eu

Reply via email to