You can delete lines and words with Acrobat and keep it in PDF format.

Art

Art Campbell
                          art.campbell at gmail.com
  "... In my opinion, there's nothing in this world beats a '52
Vincent and a redheaded grl." -- Richard Thompson
                                                      No disclaimers apply.
                                                               DoD 358



On Fri, Oct 10, 2008 at 9:30 AM, Deirdre Reagan
<deirdre.reagan at gmail.com> wrote:
> Thanks Richard --
>
> The original line drawings are coming ot me as PDFs.  I don't have
> AutoCad or Katia or any of the other programs that the engineers have,
> so I get the drawing as a PDF file.  I turn it into a jpg so I can
> erase lines and words.
>
> It would be nice to have the original vector drawing!
>
>
>
> On 10/9/08, Combs, Richard <richard.combs at polycom.com> wrote:
>> Deirdre Reagan wrote:
>>
>> > In my documents, we use black and white line drawings exclusively.
>> >
>> > I've been cutting and pasting 200 pixels / inch bitmaps.  FM scrolls
>> > through them very quickly.
>> >
>> > My colleagues import 300 pixels / inch jpgs.  Their jpgs are better
>> > quality but FM works very very slowly when scrolling past a page with
>> > a jpg.
>> >
>> > I just imported a PDF-ed graphic that was made from a 600 pixels /
>> > inch jpg.  It has the best resolution and FM scrolls through the page
>> > very quickly.
>> >
>> > So here's my question:  is there any downside to using the PDF-ed
>> graphic?
>>
>> None at all. IMHO, PDFs are a great way to import graphics into FM.
>>
>> But here's a question back to you: Where are these line drawings coming
>> from?
>>
>> See, any graphic format described in terms of pixels or dots per inch
>> (dpi) is what's called a bitmap (or raster) image -- that includes BMP,
>> JPG, PNG, and GIF. Its resolution is limited to whatever it was created
>> at (200, 300, 600 dpi). If you resize it (or zoom in), you lose
>> resolution.
>>
>> But line drawings are by nature vector images. That means they're not
>> defined in terms of a fixed resolution, but in terms of vectors -- lines
>> and arcs -- that can be scaled to any size without loss of resolution.
>> If you're starting with a vector drawing (like from Adobe Illustrator or
>> Corel Draw), it's best not to turn it into a bitmap.
>>
>> Instead, make a PDF from the original vector drawing, and it will still
>> be a scalable vector drawing in PDF form. You'll really see the
>> difference if you zoom way in (say 800%) on a bitmap version and a
>> vector version of the same drawing.
>>
>> HTH!
>> Richard
>>
>>
>> Richard G. Combs
>> Senior Technical Writer
>> Polycom, Inc.
>> richardDOTcombs AT polycomDOTcom
>> 303-223-5111
>> ------
>> rgcombs AT gmailDOTcom
>> 303-777-0436
>> ------
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
>>
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