Dear all,
I totally agree with Andy. SRM research is as vital as was nuclear
research in the 1950s, even if at the end there might be a lot of
disagreement between users.
Secondly, we cannot compare  SRM solutions to mobile phones or
vaccinations. The first are likely to affect the life of millions even
billions of people at once, while a mobile phone or a vaccine may
affect only 2 person or a few people.
Besides, modelling in geography deals with positions and resolutions
that are specific to each location or region.  This dictates the
outcome of any model applied at certain scale (global, regional,
national or local). That is why, I would hesitate to generalized to
small locations results of a model downscaled from a global one.
Parker has been so elaborate and there are so many many reasons to
have specialized centers on SRM as many as they are for CDR.
I hope that Andrew and others will hear our voice.
Thanks for offering us this platform.
Best regards,
Cush

On 4/4/18, Andy Parker <apark...@gmail.com> wrote:
> Alan, many thanks for posting this.
>
> Andrew, shouldn’t people in developing countries be the ones to decide
> whether or not they research SRM? In SRMGI’s workshops across the Global
> South participants have been opposed to SRM deployment at this stage and
> concerned that developing countries might not get a say in decisions about
> SRM, but there has also be a high level of support for local scientists to
> research the impacts that SRM might have. People have given a number of
> reasons for this. Common ones include: expertise in modelling the regional
> environment; a sensitivity to the climate impacts that matter most locally;
>
> a desire to keep the SRM debate focused on the most vulnerable people and
> countries, supporting science diplomacy so that there are strong global
> academic networks that could inform any international negotiations over
> SRM; the desire to build up SRM expertise so that, for instance, Kenyan
> policymakers are advised by Kenyan experts. All of these seem like good
> reasons to me. See also the Comment
> <https://www.nature.com/articles/d41586-018-03917-8> published in Nature
> today for a longer take on why developing countries should be centrally
> involved in SRM research.
>
> None of this argues against your idea of global SRM research centres, but I
>
> don’t see local impact analysis and global centres as mutually exclusive.
> Wouldn’t any global research centres be stronger if they could be staffed
> by researchers from across the world who were already experienced in
> analysing the impacts of SRM?
>
> Andy
>
>
> On Wednesday, April 4, 2018 at 7:49:37 AM UTC+1, Andrew Lockley wrote:
>>
>> I'm unsure why the developing world needs to do its own SRM research any
>> more than it needs to manufacture its own mobile phones or vaccinations.
>> We
>> have clusters of competence in various parts of the world for various
>> things - and distribution of effort risks dilution of competence. Perhaps
>>
>> better to get developing world scientists to take positions in global
>> centres, if their local knowledge is specifically required.
>>
>> I'd be interested to hear other views on this issue, as the centralisation
>>
>> (or otherwise) of the SRM research industry is an important issue for our
>>
>> community.
>>
>> A
>>
>>
>> On Wed, 4 Apr 2018, 03:55 Alan Robock, <rob...@envsci.rutgers.edu
>> <javascript:>> wrote:
>>
>>> FYI.
>>>
>>> Alan
>>>
>>> Alan Robock, Distinguished Professor
>>>    Editor, *Reviews of Geophysics*
>>> Department of Environmental Sciences                      Phone:
>>> +1-848-932-5751
>>> Rutgers University
>>>
>>>     Fax: +1-732-932-8644
>>> 14 College Farm Road                                E-mail:
>>> rob...@envsci.rutgers.edu <javascript:>
>>> New Brunswick, NJ 08901-8551  USA
>>> http://envsci.rutgers.edu/~robock
>>> ☮   http://twitter.com/AlanRobock   2017 Nobel Peace Prize to ICAN!
>>> Watch my 18 min TEDx talk at http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qsrEk1oZ-54
>>> Sent from my iPad
>>>
>>> Begin forwarded message:
>>>
>>> *From:* SRMGI <in...@srmgi.org <javascript:>>
>>> *Date:* April 3, 2018 at 7:59:34 PM MDT
>>> *To:* <rob...@envsci.rutgers.edu <javascript:>>
>>> *Subject:* *DECIMALS Fund – call for proposals opens today*
>>> *Reply-To:* SRMGI <in...@srmgi.org <javascript:>>
>>>
>>> DECIMALS Fund
>>> Call for proposals opens today
>>>
>>>
>>> The SRM Governance Initiative is proud to announce the opening of the
>>> call for proposals for a major new SRM modelling fund for developing
>>> country scientists: the DECIMALS Fund (Developing Country Impacts
>>> Modelling
>>> Analysis for SRM). DECIMALS will support scientists from the Global South
>>>
>>> who want to analyse how SRM geoengineering might affect their regions.
>>>
>>> DECIMALS is the first fund of its kind and it features in a Comment
>>> <https://srmgi.us17.list-manage.com/track/click?u=4ec4191d31f894c0e3eab90bb&id=bb6c71d1a4&e=5fd4608dde>
>>>
>>> that’s published today in Nature, where a group of eminent Southern
>>> scholars and NGO leaders call for developing countries to play a central
>>>
>>> role in SRM research and discussion.
>>>
>>> Grants of up to USD$70k will support scientists as they explore the
>>> climate impacts that matter most locally, from droughts to cyclones to
>>> extreme temperatures to precipitation changes. The DECIMALS Fund aims to
>>> go
>>> beyond research: its wider goals include capacity-building,
>>> community-building, and expanding the conversation around SRM. DECIMALS
>>> research teams will therefore receive financial support to attend
>>> conferences, to collaborate with each other and with SRM modelling
>>> experts,
>>> and to discuss their findings with their local communities at the end of
>>>
>>> their projects.
>>>
>>> Note that applicants do not need to be experts in SRM at the time of
>>> application, as there has been little research on this across the Global
>>>
>>> South to date. See here
>>> <https://srmgi.us17.list-manage.com/track/click?u=4ec4191d31f894c0e3eab90bb&id=24dee0734d&e=5fd4608dde>
>>>
>>> for full information about the grants, applicant eligibility, and the
>>> application process. The call is open from now until *29 May 2018.*
>>>
>>> Please do pass this along contacts and colleagues who might be interested
>>>
>>> in applying, and feel free to circulate it on departmental or
>>> professional
>>> email groups.
>>>
>>> The SRMGI team
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