Hi,

That's a great idea. The idea would be to have only on foreground
selection tool and make it automatically determine whether to use
Magic Wand or SIOX (btw.: not spelled like the native American tribe).
This shouldn't be very hard since Magic Wand's user interaction is a
subset of SIOX user interface. The determination whether to use one or
the other could depend on the amount of colors that are found in the
user-defined foreground sample. There might be a radio-button to
override the automatic choice.

Any volunteer? Maybe it's for Google Summer of Code 2010...

Gerald


On Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 5:02 PM, SorinN <nemes.so...@gmail.com> wrote:
> But probably - if we can try to identify some generic use cases and
> then to identify a sum of possible techniques / technologies to solve
> those different cases, we can put a base for a future meta tool.
>
> GIMP has already some useful tools such as color to alpha, and color
> erase (for brushes), also Gmic has color replace. Maybe if we can have
> the posibility to  pick (with a picker) which color is important to
> remain and then to pick which color (or range of colors) can go to
> aplha (probably with a color tolerance control [based on luminance, or
> other factors]), we can have a better precision for this (meta)tool,
> and saving a lot of time.
>
> This can go well in SIOUX tool. The same tool as is now but with some
> [+] color and [-] color  selectors / pickers - which will manually
> refine the alghorithm after the initial selection is done (as is now
> in SIOUX). When the color selection manually refined is ready, our
> SIOUX based tool will know much better (if not exactly) about our
> intention, about which color is important and which is not.
>
>
> 2009/9/19 Gerald Friedland <frac...@gmail.com>:
>> Hi Alex,
>>
>> Background extraction IS indeed tricky.
>>
>> First, different pictures require different tools. Everything where
>> the foreground color is essentially one color, such as drawings will
>> work best with a tool like Magic Wand. The foreground extraction Jenny
>> was improving is intended to be used on photographs and works best
>> when the fotograph features a clearly distinctive foreground but the
>> foreground can easily contain millions of colors and as of now, the
>> foreground can also have very fine structure. There is virtually no
>> tool that can deal with transparencies, reflections, and other nasty
>> stuff. When extracting objects with these issues you have to be lucky.
>>
>> Second, the way to think of these semi-automatic extraction tools is
>> to compare them with a dish washer. Very often, the dish washer will
>> do a good job and clean your dishes. So it'll save you work and it'll
>> be cleaner than if you'd done it manually in the same time. However,
>> for some pieces, the dish washer just doesn't work. Often these are
>> the pieces that are particularly difficult, sometimes though you ask
>> yourself: Why is this glass still dirty -- it's like all the other
>> glasses? So there are people who do not want a dish washer because
>> they want to be in absolute control of the cleaning process. However,
>> would you stop producing, selling, using, and improving dish washers
>> in general, just because they don't work always? The answer is of
>> course: No because in sum they are useful.
>> Same with automatic foreground extraction methods: For some images
>> they save a lot of work, for others they might cause trouble. Some
>> people will never use the tools because they want to be in complete
>> control of the segmentation process. In sum they are useful though.
>>
>> Gerald
>>
>> On Thu, Sep 17, 2009 at 10:57 PM, Alexandre Prokoudine
>> <alexandre.prokoud...@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> On Fri, Sep 18, 2009 at 2:34 AM, SorinN wrote:
>>>> Well, every background extraction is tricky - I tried PhotoshopCS 4
>>>> tools - they seems to be trivial to use and seem to be easy - but for
>>>> a complex task which need a lot of pixel precision you have to do a
>>>> lot of manually corrections too so the final feelig is a kind of
>>>> frustration - (with gimp magic wand progresive selection feature [drag
>>>> over layer left / right], I can do the same thing quicker).
>>>
>>> Are you talking about
>>> http://help.adobe.com/en_US/Photoshop/11.0/WSFD9BA8C5-31BA-4fec-81F3-CF04EE5295FCa.html
>>> ?
>>>
>>> Alexandre
>>> _______________________________________________
>>> Gimp-developer mailing list
>>> Gimp-developer@lists.XCF.Berkeley.EDU
>>> https://lists.XCF.Berkeley.EDU/mailman/listinfo/gimp-developer
>>>
>>
>> --
>> Dr. Gerald Friedland
>> International Computer Science Institute
>> 1947 Center Street, Suite 600
>> CA-94704 Berkeley, USA
>> http://www.gerald-friedland.org
>> _______________________________________________
>> Gimp-developer mailing list
>> Gimp-developer@lists.XCF.Berkeley.EDU
>> https://lists.XCF.Berkeley.EDU/mailman/listinfo/gimp-developer
>>
>
>
>
> --
> Nemes Ioan Sorin
>

--
Dr. Gerald Friedland
International Computer Science Institute
1947 Center Street, Suite 600
CA-94704 Berkeley, USA
http://www.gerald-friedland.org
--
Sent from Berkeley, CA, United States
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