In message <>
, Chris Mohler <> wrote:

>On Mon, Jan 9, 2012 at 3:39 PM, Ronald F. Guilmette
><> wrote:
>> =C2=A0But contrary to the directions on the page listed
>> above, this new script _does not_ appear to be showing up underneath
>> Filters->Script-Fu
>The menu location appears to be:
>Script-Fu> Darla =E2=80=93> Purple Fringe Fix
>Does it appear there?

DOH!  <<me, slaps forehead>>

Yea, it's there.  Thanks.  I fell dumb.  I saw "Script-Fu" under Filters
and I didn't even realize that it also had its own button.


So I applied the purple fringing fix, and it seems to have done a really
marvelous job, but now I got a new problem.

When I go to save the fixed image, I am getting a warning message saying:

     You are about to save a layer mask as JPEG.
     This will not save the visible layers.

I have no idea what this means.  Should I be worried?  Do I have to do
some other magic before I save the fixed image?

Oh boy!  It gets even weirder.  I went ahead and clicked on "Confirm" and
now I'm getting another warning saying:

     Your image should be exported before it can be saved as JPEG
     for the following reasons:

     JPEG plug-in can't handle transparency

        Flatten image

     The export conversion won't modify your original image.

Hummm...  OK, so now one of the options in response to that is "export",
so  take a chance and click on that.

Presto!  Changeo!  Well, whatever the hell all that was about, I guess it
all worked.  Here's the de-fringed image:

Looks OK to me.  And definitely less fringe.

I still worry a little about the fact that I really don't know what the hell
I'm even doing.  But what the hell!  It wouldn't be the first time. :-)


P.S.  This seems rather odd to me, but apparently Darla's defringer will
not allow itself to be applied twice, successively, to an image.  Once
you have defringed using the script, you can't get the script to re-run
on the same image, however...

If you save the defringed image to a file, exit gimp, and then run gimp
again on the defringed .JPG, then you can get the defringer to run anew.

I did that, and actually, yes, the specific image I'm working with seems to
have benefitted from having the defringer run on it twice.  Here's the image
after ONE and then TWO defringing steps:

The fringing is most notable down at the upper edge of the rain gutter and
also to the right of that, on the white stucco.  Applying two defringing
steps almost eliminated the fringing entirely.  (Yippee!)
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