I have the impression that the underlying model of a git repository is made 
of a .git archive plus a work
directory in which (some version of, e.g. the latest) the files are 
present. I.e. at least one version of
the files are stored twice.
E.g. suppose I create a new project and initialize git in it. Then I can 
create files and commit changes.
When I am done, i.e. the files are ready to be released, I make the last 
commit, and thenI have the files
in the work directory AND in the .git. At this point if I delete the files 
from the work directory, I take
the project to an inconsistent state (as reported by git status, which 
tells me that all files have been
removed). So, the "nornal" state of a released project is to have its files 
stored twice.
Is this correct?
Is this what we want?

-- 
You received this message because you are subscribed to the Google Groups "Git 
for human beings" group.
To view this discussion on the web visit 
https://groups.google.com/d/msg/git-users/-/sGf0sgwK_NwJ.
To post to this group, send email to git-users@googlegroups.com.
To unsubscribe from this group, send email to 
git-users+unsubscr...@googlegroups.com.
For more options, visit this group at 
http://groups.google.com/group/git-users?hl=en.

Reply via email to