That was it. I tried several times to delete it from fix-search, thought I 
had it a couple of times, but it was still there. When I finally succeeded 
in deleting it, and then re-added it it seems to be sticking around when I 
switch between the branches. Thanks!

On Wednesday, October 3, 2012 4:13:25 PM UTC-7, Peter J Weisberg wrote:
>
> On Wed, Oct 3, 2012 at 3:54 PM, Jeffery Brewer 
> <jeffery...@gmail.com<javascript:>> 
> wrote: 
> > I have files I move around between several different environments, and 
> in 
> > each environment I have a config file (web.config) that is unique to 
> each 
> > environment. 
> > 
> > I make changes on my machine, push them to a repository, move to a 
> > development machine and "pull" them from the repository, then move them 
> to 
> > to a test machine and "pull" them from the repository, etc. 
> > 
> > Through some trial and error I figured out that "most of the time" if I 
> put 
> > my web.config into my .gitignore file everything works fine, but not 
> always. 
> > 
> > Right now I'm spending my afternoon trying to figure out why whenever I 
> > checkout the "master" branch it deletes my web.config file. It happens 
> like 
> > this. I will have my web.config file in my directory and then checkout a 
> > branch into that directory (e.g. git checkout new-search) and everything 
> is 
> > fine. If I switch to another branch (e.g. git checkout fix-search) 
> > everything is fine as well. But when I check out the master branch (e.g. 
> git 
> > checkout master) it deletes my web.config file. 
> > 
> > Why is it deleting my config file and more importantly, how can I get it 
> to 
> > stop doing that so that I can spend my time working on code and not 
> fussing 
> > with git? 
>
> My guess is that web.config is committed in the fix-search branch. 
> When you switch to fix-search, that version of web.config is written 
> to the working tree (overwriting the file that was there, which was 
> ignored and therefore uninteresting, so Git didn't bother to tell you 
> about it).  Then when you switch from fix-search to master, Git checks 
> to see if web.config in the working tree is the same as it is in 
> fix-search.  If so, then there are no changes to deal with when 
> switching branches, and it can be safely updated to its 'master' state 
> (nonexistent). 
>
> -PJ 
>
> Gehm's Corollary to Clark's Law: Any technology distinguishable from 
> magic is insufficiently advanced. 
>

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