I do that, partially at least. I track the files in /etc. But I generally
only do it after I do a yum upgrade. All I do is:

cd /etc
sudo git init #well, only the first time
sudo git add -A .
sudo git commit -m "commit message"

You could just get in the habit of doing the last two every time you modify
anything in the /etc subdirectory hierarchy.

I also do multi-machine tracking. Similar to:

#logon to git global repository machine as root
cd /global/repositories/git
git init --bare configurations.git

On each machine do the following as root

#to start up:
cd /etc
git init
git remote add origin ssh://user@global
/global/repositories/git/configurations.git
git checkout -b $(hostname)
git add -A .
git commit -m "commit message"
git push --all
git remote set-branches --add origin other-host-1 other-host-2 ...
git fetch



When I want to compare two machine, I log on to one and do:

cd /etc
git fetch
git diff HEAD other-host

Where "other-host" is the branch name (hostname) of the second host. I
often use the --stat for a smaller output if I only want to know the names
of the differing files and not the actual differences.

If you have multiple hosts, you can do all the compares on a given host by
doing the "git fetch" and then do:

git diff host1 host2

because the branch name for the files on host1 is host1 and is host2 for
host2.

When you set up another host, you will need to do the above, then do a "git
remote set-branches --add origin new-host" on every other host so that a
"git fetch" on those hosts will pick up the new host.

Oh, I you only want to do the compares on a specific host, then you can do
the "get remote set-branches" just on that specific host.

Don't know if this is of any help to you or not. I hope it made some sense.



On Thu, Mar 28, 2013 at 12:22 PM, Dale R. Worley <wor...@alum.mit.edu>wrote:

> I'm considering using Git to track the customizations I make to the
> system files of my Linux box.  Has anyone done that and has hints on
> how to make it work well?
>
> Actually, I have two Linux boxes, and I need to track both sets of
> customizations.  It looks easy enough to have one repository on each,
> and each has a tracking branch for the other repository.  But I'm not
> clear on how to do the bookkeeping for cross-merging customizations
> that are first inserted on one machine to the other.  I have a feeling
> that I want something that tracks which deltas from one lineage have
> been merged into the other lineage, along the lines of the bookkeeping
> that "svn merge" does.
>
> Dale
>
> Dale Worley
> --
> Morning amnesia -- Nature's way of keeping you from waking up screaming.
> -- "Dilbert"
>
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