Thanx, sorted as suggested i change settings in control panel.
Thanx

On Friday, 5 December 2014 11:29:33 UTC, Konstantin Khomoutov wrote:
>
> On Fri, 5 Dec 2014 08:18:20 -0000 
> "Philip Oakley" <philip...@iee.org <javascript:>> wrote: 
>
> > ----- Original Message ----- 
> >   From: Aafaq Mateen 
> >   To: git-...@googlegroups.com <javascript:> 
> >   Sent: Thursday, December 04, 2014 3:22 PM 
> >   Subject: [git-users] no .git folder when creating new repository 
> > 
> > 
> >   Hi 
> >      I down loaded the Git Windows version 1.9.4 and gave my name and 
> > email at bash and  come back to Git GUI to create new repository.I 
> > cant see any .git folder in the newly created folder on my desktop. 
> > 
> >   just wondering why its happening ..I tried couple of time 
> > uninstalling and stalling git back but its the same . 
> >   please help in this regard. 
> > Have you set your system to show 'hidden files and folders'? 
> > 
> > Any file or folder (in windows) that begins with a dot is by default 
> > a hidden file/folder. 
>
> This is not correct: Windows does not have a convention of hiding 
> anything based on the names -- what it has, but only in one particular 
> piece of software -- Windows Explorer -- which is "the shell" 
> responsible, among other things, for browsing files, is hiding by 
> default the predefined set of "system" paths as well as hiding 
> extensions of files of "registered types" (my pet target for bashing 
> default settings on this class of OSes).  The reason the OP can't see 
> the ".git" subdirectory is Git explicitly setting the attribute "hidden" 
> on that directory after creating it; to demonstrate: 
>
> C:\tmp>git init foo 
> Initialized empty Git repository in C:/tmp/foo/.git/ 
>
> C:\tmp>attrib foo\.git 
>     H      C:\tmp\foo\.git 
>
> "H" here stands for "hidden". Run attr /? in the command prompt to see 
> what other attributes are supported on Windows filesystems (FATs, NTFS). 
>
> > *nix has a similar protocol. 
>
> Only in a sense: interactive command-line shells (like bash) and dumbed 
> down graphical shells like Nautilus indeed do not show "dotfiles" by 
> default, and command-line shells also by default exclude such files 
> from globbing operations, IIRC.  These files are not really hidden as 
> POSIX does not mandate implementing such a file attribute on 
> filesystems. So yes, they are hidden by policy only. 
>
> > In Windows Explorer you can set a preference to show them by default 
> > (see Google;-) 
>
> That is correct, yes. 
> My personal approach instead is to use a sensible file-browsing tool 
> for heavy-lifting operations leaving Windows Explorer for quick ad-hoc 
> tasks, and then it can be left mostly with default settings. 
> To name a few such tools, there are: FAR manager [1] (I admit it's 
> hardly popular anywhere except in the ex-USSR lands), Total Commander 
> [2] (proprietary), Free Commander [3] (Total Commander clone, 
> freeware), ╬╝Commander [4] (Java, for those with lots of free RAM, so 
> they've picked a classy name) etc. 
>
> [...] 
>
> 1. http://www.farmanager.com/ 
> 2. http://www.ghisler.com/ 
> 3. http://www.freecommander.com 
> 4. http://www.mucommander.com/ 
>

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