From: "Dale R. Worley" <wor...@alum.mit.edu>
William Lasiewicz <lasiew...@gmail.com> writes:
All I want to do it create a repository on the server, add some files locally from my machine, push and go to another machine and actually see
those files.
In any other tool,  this is completly easy


The Git command structure has grown over time and at no point did
someone take firm control of it to ensure that the user interface was
easy to understand, that the underlying data structures were
straightforward, or that the documentation/books are easy to
understand. (You can compare this to Subversion, where it is clear that a very good designer has spent a lot of thought and effort to enforce a
simple patterns over both the commands and the data structure, while
still allowing a great deal of generality.) Part of this complexity is
because GIT supports a decentralized development model, which is more
complicated to support.

The cli has grown like topsy/unix so it can be a bit of a backward compatiblity shanty town.


but in GIT,  there is about a
50% you are going to lose everything.  How in the hell can this be so
popular?

You've said it yourself, "it is free".


And, `It works`.

It works for Linux Kernel
http://arstechnica.com/information-technology/2015/02/linux-has-2000-new-developers-and-gets-10000-patches-for-each-version/ that's 7.7 commits per hour!

I use it (including the git gui & gitk to regain some simplicity) despite my company VCS (dead hand process style) because `It works well for me/developers`. It takes management a long while to 'appreciate' (G)it because of the feeling of a loss of control (which they never actually had...)

--
Philip
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