On Wed, 7 Sep 2016 15:28:58 -0700 (PDT)
edgaroliveira....@gmail.com wrote:

> I thought the git is good for all types project. Because the Linux 
> distribution using this Version Control System.

Some nitpicking first, sorry: "Linux" is the name of a project
implementing an operating system's kernel.  The kernel is a piece of
software which makes hardware breath: it mediates between the hardware
and "the userspace" where programs live.

"A distribution" is a term commonly applied to denote a full-blown
operating system which uses the Linux kernel as its core component.
Say, Ubuntu is a distribution, Debian, Gentoo, SUSE, Red Hat
Enterprise Linux, Arch Linux et all are all examples of
Linux-based distributions (or "distros" for short).

> I haven't sure this thought, am I right?

No, unfortunately, you're not.

While Linux is indeed an insanely huge project, it neither is the
biggest one managed by Git (say, Mozilla Firefox is larger IIRC) nor
does it possess all _possible_ properties which may affect how Git
handles it.  Here's what I mean: Git was (and is) in the first place
designed to manage the development of Linux, and this means it's
naturally _biased_ towards it.  This means several things.
To name just a few:
* It's perfectly able to have a very large number of small- to
  middle-sized textual files.
* ...which change at a relatively small rate (I mean, cases when 99%
  of the project files are rewritten in the next commit are quite rare).
* Fully distributed development with multiple "stages" of the code
  flowing from the contributors to the "main" tree (published by Linux).
  Among other things, this means providing no centralized locks
  and access controls.
* The whole project is a single logical piece of information.
* Git is not afraid to give your power in exchange expecing its users
  to actually educate themselves.

Hence some people come to grips with Git when they want:
* No-brainer approach to using a VCS.
* Access controls (who may push what and where).
* Centralized locks.
* Managing big binary assets.
* Having _recorded_ per-file and/or per-directory histories of changes.
(Sure there are others; these are what I can remember off the top of my
head.)

All the "issues" explained above can be addressed by 3rd-party software
"wrapping" stock Git but still Git is not for all tasks and not for
everyone.

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