`fnmatch(3)` is a great mention if the intended audience is
programmers. For normal users it's probably better to spell out what
a shell glob is.

This paragraph is updated to roughly tell what the main wildcards are
supposed to do. All the details are still hidden away behind the
`fnmatch(3)` wall because bringing the whole specification here may be
too much.

Signed-off-by: Nguyễn Thái Ngọc Duy <pclo...@gmail.com>
---
 Documentation/gitignore.txt | 11 +++++------
 1 file changed, 5 insertions(+), 6 deletions(-)

diff --git a/Documentation/gitignore.txt b/Documentation/gitignore.txt
index 63260f0056..0f4b1360bd 100644
--- a/Documentation/gitignore.txt
+++ b/Documentation/gitignore.txt
@@ -102,12 +102,11 @@ PATTERN FORMAT
    (relative to the toplevel of the work tree if not from a
    `.gitignore` file).
 
- - Otherwise, Git treats the pattern as a shell glob suitable
-   for consumption by fnmatch(3) with the FNM_PATHNAME flag:
-   wildcards in the pattern will not match a / in the pathname.
-   For example, "Documentation/{asterisk}.html" matches
-   "Documentation/git.html" but not "Documentation/ppc/ppc.html"
-   or "tools/perf/Documentation/perf.html".
+ - Otherwise, Git treats the pattern as a shell glob: '{asterisk}'
+   matches anything except '/', '?' matches any one character except
+   '/' and '[]' matches one character in a selected range. See
+   fnmatch(3) and the FNM_PATHNAME flag for a more accurate
+   description.
 
  - A leading slash matches the beginning of the pathname.
    For example, "/{asterisk}.c" matches "cat-file.c" but not
-- 
2.16.1.205.g271f633410

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