(I'm attempting to combine the various separate email replies into a single response here, please forgive me if I mangle something up.)


On Jul 14, 2013, at 22:12, Jeff King wrote:
On Sun, Jul 14, 2013 at 09:02:19PM -0700, Junio C Hamano wrote:

Or proceed with what's there right now (there are a few pending
updates from reviewers) and then, as Junio says above, adjust it later
if needed?

I have been assuming that "strictly textual match" will be a subset
of the matching semantics Aaron and Peff suggested.  That is, if we
include your version in the upcoming release, the user writes the
http.<URLpattern>.<variable> configuration so that the entries match
what they want them to match, the enhanced URL matcher Aaron and
Peff suggested will still make them match.

Am I mistaken?  Will there be some <URLpattern> that will not match
with the same URL literally?

I think we need to decide now, because the two schemes are not
compatible, and switching will break setups. Yes, the matcher that Aaron
and I suggest is a strict superset (i.e., we will not stop matching
things that used to match), which is good. But we would not be able to
implement "longest prefix wins" overriding anymore, which would change
the meaning of cases like:

 [http "https://example.com";] foo = 1
 [http] foo = 2

(under Kyle's scheme it is "1", and under ours "2"). We can probably
come up with some clever rules for overriding a broken-down URL that
would stay backwards compatible. E.g., longest-prefix-match if there are
no wildcarded components, and last-one-wins if there are. But that is
not a rule I would want readers to have to puzzle out in the
documentation.

So I think we are much better off to decide the semantics now.

Yes.  Consider these two commands:

git config http.foo = 2
git config http.https://example.com/.foo = 1

I am proposing that this means https://example.com has foo set to 1 (assuming there are no other http*.foo configurations).

The other proposal probably means that, but it might not.

Given this sequence:

git config http.foo = 2
git config http.https://example.com/.foo = 1


or this sequence:

git config http.https://example.com/.foo = 1
git config http.foo = 2

what actually happens when using the other proposal will depend on whether or not the user has previously configured any other "http.*" setting or any other "http.https://example.com/.*"; setting since doing so would have established such a section in the config file and it will affect the order the directives are processed since they will be added to the existing section rather than creating a new same-named section at the end of the file.

For this reason the order the above two "git config" commands are given cannot be relied upon to determine what setting http.foo will have when a https://example.com/ url is accessed.

Since git config does not have a "git config --placing-after-section section-name http.foo 2" option it seems to me that the only way to be sure what you would end up with using this method is to examine the created config file (git config -l would be sufficient although probably harder to read than viewing the config file itself).

For an individual .git/config file I don't expect this to be an issue. However for the --global config file, I believe quite some time could go by between setting one http.* option and another so it seems quite likely to me that the user may not remember or have ever been aware of what order the various [http*] sections are currently in.

This is why I originally proposed longest-match-wins semantics, but please read on.



On Jul 14, 2013, at 22:06, Jeff King wrote:
I admit that these are unlikely to come up in practice, but I am worried
that there is some room for mischief here. For example:

 https://example.com%2ftricky.host/repo.git

This is actually an invalid URL. Host names may not contain '%' characters and can only be followed by optionally ':port' and then one of '/', '?', or '#'. A URL parser would actually die when it sees the '%' there as there's no way to match that to the URL grammar rules. (It wouldn't actually be taken as part of the host name even though it may appear to be.)

If we canonicalize that into:

 https://example.com/tricky.host/repo.git

I don't think this will be a concern since that is an invalid normalization. Perhaps there is another example that is also concerning that needs to be addressed?


One of the things that gets encoded are the delimiting characters. So if
I have the URL:

 https://foo%3a...@example.com

you would "canonicalize" it into:

 https://foo:b...@example.com

But those are two different URLs entirely; the first has the username
"foo:bar", and the second has the username "foo" and the password "bar".

That would be an incorrect normalization according to RFC 3986. '@', '/' and ':' must be escaped in the user:password portion and decoding them there is verboten (prohibited). And delimiters in general may not have their escaping changed during normalization.

So I think the three options are basically:

 1. No decoding, require the user to use a consistent prefix between
    config and other uses of the URL. I.e., your current patch. The
    downside is that it doesn't handle any variation of input.

I have previously agreed with Aaron about this and am no longer proposing this.


2. Full decoding into constituent parts. This handles canonicalization
    of encoding, and also allows "wildcard" components (e.g., a URL
    with username can match the generic "https://example.com"; in the
config). The downside is that you cannot do a "longest prefix wins"
    rule for overriding.

 3. Full decoding as in (2), but then re-assemble into a canonicalized
    encoded URL. The upside is that you get to do "longest prefix
wins", but you can no longer have wildcard components. I think this
    is what you are suggesting in your mail.

I'm still in favor of (2), because I think the wildcard components are
important (and while I agree that the "longest prefix wins" is nicer, we
already have "last one wins" for the rest of the config, including the
credential URL matcher). But I certainly think (3) is better than (1).

AIUI, currently "last one wins" only applies to same-named options. That is, if I have these:

[svn-remote "svn"]
        useSvnsyncProps = true
[svn]
        useSvnsyncProps = false

When fetching using git-svn, useSvnsyncProps will be true since "svn- remote.svn.useSvnsyncProps" and "svn.useSvnsyncProps" are different property names.



I think we've agreed that any matches must match:

1) the scheme (http:,https:,...)

2) the host name

3) the port number

4) at least a prefix of the path (that does not seem to be in question, the question seems to be whether or not longest match wins or last seen when processed by git_config() wins)

In that case the only wildcard in question is the user name. (I don't think anyone is proposing matching on the user password when it has been included directly in the URL.)



I propose that:

1) URLs be normalized before attempting any matching (RFC 3986 rules here)

2) Allow a config <url> without a user to match a given url with a user (otherwise, the user part must match exactly)

2) Longest length path match wins (to avoid users needing to be cognizant of the actual order sections appear in their config file)

3) If there are multiple same-path-length matches, the last one encountered wins except that exact user matches are preferred over matches where the url contains a user but the config <url> does not.



On Jul 14, 2013, at 21:02, Junio C Hamano wrote:
"Kyle J. McKay" <mack...@gmail.com> writes:

On Jul 12, 2013, at 13:58, Aaron Schrab wrote:
...
This should guarantee a match in the scenario Aaron proposes above and
still has pretty much the same easy explanation to the user.

Shall I go ahead and add that to the next patch version?

Or proceed with what's there right now (there are a few pending
updates from reviewers) and then, as Junio says above, adjust it later
if needed?

I have been assuming that "strictly textual match" will be a subset
of the matching semantics Aaron and Peff suggested.  That is, if we
include your version in the upcoming release, the user writes the
http.<URLpattern>.<variable> configuration so that the entries match
what they want them to match, the enhanced URL matcher Aaron and
Peff suggested will still make them match.

Yes. Normalizing the URLs will only create more matches, it will not cause any current matches to stop matching.

Am I mistaken?  Will there be some <URLpattern> that will not match
with the same URL literally?

I believe you are correct.

Assuming that Aaron and Peff's enhancement will not be a backward
incompatible update, my preference is to take the posted matching
semantics as-is (you may have some other changes that does not
change the "strictly textual match" semantics).



So along these lines I have prepared a forthcoming [PATCH v5] that adds url normalization before the comparisons. The url normalization is added as a separate patch in the patch series on top of the textual matching with a test on top of that (it also includes the "fix parsing of http.sslCertPasswordProtected" change as a preparatory patch).

The forthcoming patch does not include wildcard user matching, but the same principle applies in that adding wildcard user matching in the future will only create more matches without causing any current matches to stop matching.

I appreciate the time you reviewers have spent looking at these patches and sending feedback. I would like to see this recognized in the patch with a suitable annotation (Reviewed-By: or Feedback-From: or whatever's appropriate). I am unclear on how to make this happen since, as has been pointed out, I cannot actually include a 'Reviewed- By:' line in a new patch I send out since such a new patch has not yet actually been reviewed no matter the content.

Thanks for your help,
Kyle
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