On Tue, Aug 05, 2014 at 03:14:48PM -0700, Junio C Hamano wrote:
> Linus Arver <linusar...@gmail.com> writes:
> 
> > Signed-off-by: Linus Arver <linusar...@gmail.com>
> > ---
> >  Documentation/git-init.txt | 6 ++++--
> >  1 file changed, 4 insertions(+), 2 deletions(-)
> >
> > diff --git a/Documentation/git-init.txt b/Documentation/git-init.txt
> > index b94d165..16e9f9c 100644
> > --- a/Documentation/git-init.txt
> > +++ b/Documentation/git-init.txt
> > @@ -138,10 +138,12 @@ Start a new Git repository for an existing code base::
> >  $ cd /path/to/my/codebase
> >  $ git init      <1>
> >  $ git add .     <2>
> > +$ git commit    <3>
> 
> I agree it is a good discipline to make the initial "pristine"
> import immediately after "git add ." without doing anything else.
> Perhaps the description below wants to make it more explicit?
> 

I could add a comment like the following:

    For new repositories, creating a commit immediately after "git add
    ." is good practice as it will cleanly separate any preexisting work
    (done under some other VCS, for example) from any new work done with
    git.

Does this make sense? I am not sure how explicit you want it to be, or
whether I captured what you wanted to be explained.

Actually, I would like to know if anything is special about the
"root-commit" (I only know it is written as such, with a hyphen, because
that is what you get from git's output message). I am not sure if this
"root-commit" idea is explained in detail in git's other documentation.
> >  ----------------
> >  +
> > -<1> prepare /path/to/my/codebase/.git directory
> > -<2> add all existing file to the index
> > +<1> Create a /path/to/my/codebase/.git directory.
> > +<2> Add all existing files to the index.
> > +<3> Create the first root-commit.
> >  
> >  GIT
> >  ---
--
To unsubscribe from this list: send the line "unsubscribe git" in
the body of a message to majord...@vger.kernel.org
More majordomo info at  http://vger.kernel.org/majordomo-info.html

Reply via email to