Do a few changes to make the output look better:

- use bullets on trivial patches list;
- use monotonic font for tools name;
- use :manpage:`foo` for man pages;
- don't put all references to maintainer*html at the same line.

Signed-off-by: Mauro Carvalho Chehab <mche...@s-opensource.com>
---
 Documentation/SubmittingPatches | 100 ++++++++++++++++++++++------------------
 1 file changed, 55 insertions(+), 45 deletions(-)

diff --git a/Documentation/SubmittingPatches b/Documentation/SubmittingPatches
index 04a4284d8ee4..352771b736cd 100644
--- a/Documentation/SubmittingPatches
+++ b/Documentation/SubmittingPatches
@@ -15,10 +15,10 @@ submitting code.  If you are submitting a driver, also read
 Documentation/SubmittingDrivers; for device tree binding patches, read
 Documentation/devicetree/bindings/submitting-patches.txt.
 
-Many of these steps describe the default behavior of the git version
-control system; if you use git to prepare your patches, you'll find much
+Many of these steps describe the default behavior of the ``git`` version
+control system; if you use ``git`` to prepare your patches, you'll find much
 of the mechanical work done for you, though you'll still need to prepare
-and document a sensible set of patches.  In general, use of git will make
+and document a sensible set of patches.  In general, use of ``git`` will make
 your life as a kernel developer easier.
 
 Creating and Sending your Change
@@ -29,7 +29,7 @@ Creating and Sending your Change
 -------------------------------
 
 If you do not have a repository with the current kernel source handy, use
-git to obtain one.  You'll want to start with the mainline repository,
+``git`` to obtain one.  You'll want to start with the mainline repository,
 which can be grabbed with::
 
   git clone git://git.kernel.org/pub/scm/linux/kernel/git/torvalds/linux.git
@@ -48,13 +48,14 @@ in the next section), but that is the hard way to do kernel 
development.
 
 If you must generate your patches by hand, use ``diff -up`` or ``diff -uprN``
 to create patches.  Git generates patches in this form by default; if
-you're using git, you can skip this section entirely.
+you're using ``git``, you can skip this section entirely.
 
 All changes to the Linux kernel occur in the form of patches, as
-generated by diff(1).  When creating your patch, make sure to create it
-in "unified diff" format, as supplied by the ``-u`` argument to diff(1).
+generated by :manpage:`diff(1)`.  When creating your patch, make sure to
+create it in "unified diff" format, as supplied by the ``-u`` argument
+to :manpage:`diff(1)`.
 Also, please use the ``-p`` argument which shows which C function each
-change is in - that makes the resultant diff a lot easier to read.
+change is in - that makes the resultant ``diff`` a lot easier to read.
 Patches should be based in the root kernel source directory,
 not in any lower subdirectory.
 
@@ -70,7 +71,7 @@ To create a patch for a single file, it is often sufficient 
to do::
        diff -up $SRCTREE/$MYFILE{.orig,} > /tmp/patch
 
 To create a patch for multiple files, you should unpack a "vanilla",
-or unmodified kernel source tree, and generate a diff against your
+or unmodified kernel source tree, and generate a ``diff`` against your
 own source tree.  For example::
 
        MYSRC= /devel/linux
@@ -81,20 +82,20 @@ own source tree.  For example::
                linux-3.19-vanilla $MYSRC > /tmp/patch
 
 ``dontdiff`` is a list of files which are generated by the kernel during
-the build process, and should be ignored in any diff(1)-generated
+the build process, and should be ignored in any :manpage:`diff(1)`-generated
 patch.
 
 Make sure your patch does not include any extra files which do not
 belong in a patch submission.  Make sure to review your patch -after-
-generating it with diff(1), to ensure accuracy.
+generating it with :manpage:`diff(1)`, to ensure accuracy.
 
 If your changes produce a lot of deltas, you need to split them into
 individual patches which modify things in logical stages; see
 :ref:`split_changes`.  This will facilitate review by other kernel developers,
 very important if you want your patch accepted.
 
-If you're using git, ``git rebase -i`` can help you with this process.  If
-you're not using git, quilt <http://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/quilt>
+If you're using ``git``, ``git rebase -i`` can help you with this process.  If
+you're not using ``git``, ``quilt`` <http://savannah.nongnu.org/projects/quilt>
 is another popular alternative.
 
 .. _describe_changes:
@@ -133,7 +134,7 @@ as you intend it to.
 
 The maintainer will thank you if you write your patch description in a
 form which can be easily pulled into Linux's source code management
-system, git, as a "commit log".  See :ref:`explicit_in_reply_to`.
+system, ``git``, as a "commit log".  See :ref:`explicit_in_reply_to`.
 
 Solve only one problem per patch.  If your description starts to get
 long, that's a sign that you probably need to split up your patch.
@@ -156,7 +157,7 @@ its behaviour.
 If the patch fixes a logged bug entry, refer to that bug entry by
 number and URL.  If the patch follows from a mailing list discussion,
 give a URL to the mailing list archive; use the https://lkml.kernel.org/
-redirector with a Message-Id, to ensure that the links cannot become
+redirector with a ``Message-Id``, to ensure that the links cannot become
 stale.
 
 However, try to make your explanation understandable without external
@@ -181,13 +182,13 @@ there is no collision with your six-character ID now, 
that condition may
 change five years from now.
 
 If your patch fixes a bug in a specific commit, e.g. you found an issue using
-git-bisect, please use the 'Fixes:' tag with the first 12 characters of the
-SHA-1 ID, and the one line summary.  For example::
+``git bisect``, please use the 'Fixes:' tag with the first 12 characters of
+the SHA-1 ID, and the one line summary.  For example::
 
        Fixes: e21d2170f366 ("video: remove unnecessary platform_set_drvdata()")
 
-The following git-config settings can be used to add a pretty format for
-outputting the above style in the git log or git show commands::
+The following ``git config`` settings can be used to add a pretty format for
+outputting the above style in the ``git log`` or ``git show`` commands::
 
        [core]
                abbrev = 12
@@ -318,17 +319,17 @@ into the MAINTAINERS file for its current manager.
 
 Trivial patches must qualify for one of the following rules:
 
- Spelling fixes in documentation
- Spelling fixes for errors which could break grep(1)
- Warning fixes (cluttering with useless warnings is bad)
- Compilation fixes (only if they are actually correct)
- Runtime fixes (only if they actually fix things)
- Removing use of deprecated functions/macros
- Contact detail and documentation fixes
- Non-portable code replaced by portable code (even in arch-specific,
- since people copy, as long as it's trivial)
- Any fix by the author/maintainer of the file (ie. patch monkey
- in re-transmission mode)
+- Spelling fixes in documentation
+- Spelling fixes for errors which could break :manpage:`grep(1)`
+- Warning fixes (cluttering with useless warnings is bad)
+- Compilation fixes (only if they are actually correct)
+- Runtime fixes (only if they actually fix things)
+- Removing use of deprecated functions/macros
+- Contact detail and documentation fixes
+- Non-portable code replaced by portable code (even in arch-specific,
+  since people copy, as long as it's trivial)
+- Any fix by the author/maintainer of the file (ie. patch monkey
+  in re-transmission mode)
 
 
 
@@ -341,8 +342,11 @@ developer to be able to "quote" your changes, using 
standard e-mail
 tools, so that they may comment on specific portions of your code.
 
 For this reason, all patches should be submitted by e-mail "inline".
-WARNING:  Be wary of your editor's word-wrap corrupting your patch,
-if you choose to cut-n-paste your patch.
+
+.. warning::
+
+  Be wary of your editor's word-wrap corrupting your patch,
+  if you choose to cut-n-paste your patch.
 
 Do not attach the patch as a MIME attachment, compressed or not.
 Many popular e-mail applications will not always transmit a MIME
@@ -604,7 +608,7 @@ for more details.
 ------------------------------
 
 This section describes how the patch itself should be formatted.  Note
-that, if you have your patches stored in a git repository, proper patch
+that, if you have your patches stored in a ``git`` repository, proper patch
 formatting can be had with ``git format-patch``.  The tools cannot create
 the necessary text, though, so read the instructions below anyway.
 
@@ -629,7 +633,7 @@ The canonical patch message body contains the following:
 
   - Any additional comments not suitable for the changelog.
 
-  - The actual patch (diff output).
+  - The actual patch (``diff`` output).
 
 The Subject line format makes it very easy to sort the emails
 alphabetically by subject line - pretty much any email reader will
@@ -647,13 +651,13 @@ series`` is an ordered sequence of multiple, related 
patches).
 
 Bear in mind that the ``summary phrase`` of your email becomes a
 globally-unique identifier for that patch.  It propagates all the way
-into the git changelog.  The ``summary phrase`` may later be used in
+into the ``git`` changelog.  The ``summary phrase`` may later be used in
 developer discussions which refer to the patch.  People will want to
 google for the ``summary phrase`` to read discussion regarding that
 patch.  It will also be the only thing that people may quickly see
 when, two or three months later, they are going through perhaps
-thousands of patches using tools such as ``gitk`` or "git log
---oneline".
+thousands of patches using tools such as ``gitk`` or ``git log
+--oneline``.
 
 For these reasons, the ``summary`` must be no more than 70-75
 characters, and it must describe both what the patch changes, as well
@@ -704,18 +708,18 @@ The ``---`` marker line serves the essential purpose of 
marking for patch
 handling tools where the changelog message ends.
 
 One good use for the additional comments after the ``---`` marker is for
-a diffstat, to show what files have changed, and the number of
-inserted and deleted lines per file.  A diffstat is especially useful
+a ``diffstat``, to show what files have changed, and the number of
+inserted and deleted lines per file.  A ``diffstat`` is especially useful
 on bigger patches.  Other comments relevant only to the moment or the
 maintainer, not suitable for the permanent changelog, should also go
 here.  A good example of such comments might be ``patch changelogs``
 which describe what has changed between the v1 and v2 version of the
 patch.
 
-If you are going to include a diffstat after the ``---`` marker, please
-use diffstat options ``-p 1 -w 70`` so that filenames are listed from
+If you are going to include a ``diffstat`` after the ``---`` marker, please
+use ``diffstat`` options ``-p 1 -w 70`` so that filenames are listed from
 the top of the kernel source tree and don't use too much horizontal
-space (easily fit in 80 columns, maybe with some indentation).  (git
+space (easily fit in 80 columns, maybe with some indentation).  (``git``
 generates appropriate diffstats by default.)
 
 See more details on the proper patch format in the following
@@ -761,9 +765,9 @@ interest on a single line; it should look something like::
 
 A pull request should also include an overall message saying what will be
 included in the request, a ``git shortlog`` listing of the patches
-themselves, and a diffstat showing the overall effect of the patch series.
+themselves, and a ``diffstat`` showing the overall effect of the patch series.
 The easiest way to get all this information together is, of course, to let
-git do it for you with the ``git request-pull`` command.
+``git`` do it for you with the ``git request-pull`` command.
 
 Some maintainers (including Linus) want to see pull requests from signed
 commits; that increases their confidence that the request actually came
@@ -775,7 +779,7 @@ signed by one or more core kernel developers.  This step 
can be hard for
 new developers, but there is no way around it.  Attending conferences can
 be a good way to find developers who can sign your key.
 
-Once you have prepared a patch series in git that you wish to have somebody
+Once you have prepared a patch series in ``git`` that you wish to have somebody
 pull, create a signed tag with ``git tag -s``.  This will create a new tag
 identifying the last commit in the series and containing a signature
 created with your private key.  You will also have the opportunity to add a
@@ -803,10 +807,15 @@ Jeff Garzik, "Linux kernel patch submission format".
 
 Greg Kroah-Hartman, "How to piss off a kernel subsystem maintainer".
   <http://www.kroah.com/log/linux/maintainer.html>
+
   <http://www.kroah.com/log/linux/maintainer-02.html>
+
   <http://www.kroah.com/log/linux/maintainer-03.html>
+
   <http://www.kroah.com/log/linux/maintainer-04.html>
+
   <http://www.kroah.com/log/linux/maintainer-05.html>
+
   <http://www.kroah.com/log/linux/maintainer-06.html>
 
 NO!!!! No more huge patch bombs to linux-kernel@vger.kernel.org people!
@@ -820,5 +829,6 @@ Linus Torvalds's mail on the canonical patch format:
 
 Andi Kleen, "On submitting kernel patches"
   Some strategies to get difficult or controversial changes in.
+
   http://halobates.de/on-submitting-patches.pdf
 
-- 
2.7.4


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