I've taught with the Penguins of the Eclogues and Georgics, and both seem to work. I don't expect great literary merit in a teaching translation, but Lee's Ecogues read fairly well, and have Latin on the facing page. Wilkinson's Georgics is serviceable, and allows me to make points I want to make, and students seem to be able to understand them (if we can ever understand the Georgics), if I introduce them extensively. Both have decent notes, though a tiny bit outdated; the notes of both can be used by people who take a different take on the poems.

For the Aeneid I use Fitzgerald, but wish there was something with decent notes.



Quoting Antonio Cussen <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>:


El 05-09-2006, a las 14:32, Leofranc Holford-Strevens escribis:

In message <[EMAIL PROTECTED]>, Christine Perkell <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> writes
why not order two different paperbacks--one Aeneid, one Eclogues/ Georgics. I should think the Loeb would be deadly.

I admit to knowing nothing about what students want, even in Britain let alone in America, nor have I ever looked at the Loeb in question beyond seeing what Goold had to say about some difficulty, but what is being sought in an English translation: something that gives a reasonable approximation to the surface sense, or something that has literary life? I can imagine that the former, if in workaday prose, would be deadly, and the latter convey too much of the wrong life; personally I find (for instance) Dryden a lot easier to take than Day Lewis, but that is because I appreciate seventeenth-century poets more than twentieth, not because in either case I feel I am reading Vergil.

Leofranc Holford-Strevens
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Leofranc Holford-Strevens
67 St Bernard's Road                                         usque  adeone
Oxford               scire MEVM nihil est, nisi ME scire hoc sciat  alter?
OX2 6EJ

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--
Jim O'Hara
Paddison Professor of Latin and Department Chair
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Forthcoming book:
Inconsistency in Roman Epic: Studies in Catullus, Lucretius, Vergil, Ovid and Lucan
http://www.cambridge.org/us/catalogue/catalogue.asp?isbn=0521646421


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