The command I executed was run on OpenBSD:

$ uname -a
OpenBSD XXX 6.3 GENERIC.MP#107 amd64

$ /bin/date -d 'now -1 day' '+%Y_%m_%d'
2018_04_09

$ /bin/date -d 'yesterday' '+%Y_%m_%d'
2018_04_09

I don't know when it was imported into BSD's date, but this extension is available on OpenBSD, at least in 6.3...

Regards.

Christophe

Le 04/09/18 à 10:54, Otto Moerbeek a écrit :
On Mon, Apr 09, 2018 at 10:38:11AM +0200, Christophe Simon wrote:

Hi,

You can use this form, which is a little simpler:

     date -d 'now -1 day' '+%Y_%m_%d'

Nope, this is a GNU extension.

        -Otto


Regards

Christophe

Le 04/09/18 à 07:54, Robert Klein a écrit :
Hi Max,

this works for me:

date -r $(( $(date +%s) - 1 * 24 * 60 * 60 )) +%Y_%m_%d


Best regards
Robert

On Mon, 09 Apr 2018 07:45:05 +0200
Max Power <open...@cpnetserver.net> wrote:

Hi guys,
How can I do to get yesterday's date?
I need for create a backup directory.
On Linux:
yesterday=backup_$(date -d "yesterday" '+%Y_%m_%d')
mkdir -p /raid1/backup/$yesterday

Thanks for reply.





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