Your i3status problem with an out-of-ports build is probably because the
configure script runs "make" with a file that has GNU make syntax. Running
it with "MAKE=gmake" in the environment fixes this (this is one of many
things that are set automatically by the ports infrastructure).

On 2020-11-28, Hannu Vuolasaho <vuokkose...@gmail.com> wrote:
> la 28. marrask. 2020 klo 16.11 Stefan Sperling (s...@stsp.name) kirjoitti:
>
>> You can then extract your fix and apply it to an upstream development tree.
>> If additional patches are required to get the software to compile, you
>> might as well attempt to upstream those changes, too, while at it.
>>
> Is there a way to follow the development repository within the ports tree?

Not directly. Point MASTER_SITES/DISTNAME to a tar, if it's on github
you can use their on-the-fly tar generation like this

GH_ACCOUNT=     i3
GH_PROJECT=     i3status
GH_COMMIT=      3f27399d730bb9a66bebfed6aff2660828687ca5
DISTNAME=       i3status-2.13pl20201009

and remove MASTER_SITES and EXTRACT_SUFX. "make makesum" to download
and update distinfo. "make patch", if there are conflicts fix them up and
"make update-patches", "make clean", and "make patch" again.
Assuming you get it to build successfully you'll need "make plist" to
update pkg/PLIST.

When you use GH_* variables, DISTNAME is used to set the name of the
file the tar is written to locally, and the default name for the package
created - the format I showed above avoids interfering with possible
future releases (ports has some checks to avoid a version number "going
backwards" and avoid some changes being made to the port without
changing the version or revision number - it can be cleaned separately
but it's easier to avoid it in the first place).

> The scenario is that I write some patch which fixes something and then
> gets to the project tree. Then the testing and fixing cycle starts again.
>
> I know a few programs which are easy to compile in ~/src but writing a
> port is PITA.

There are some things like this, but once you're familiar with ports
it's usually less of a PITA to write a port rather than figure out
what the build/install has done to your system if/when you want to
remove it.


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