Thanks for your remark. I gave it a try on postgresql 11.5. Running different 
versions of my query against it gives the same result for my case:

SELECT CONCAT(username, '@', domain) FROM users WHERE ?1 LIKE mailbox;
SELECT CONCAT(username, '@', domain) FROM users WHERE mailbox LIKE ?1;

I'm still stuck concerning my actual problem. As far as I understand the 
senders table should return a list of all addresses the user may send mail from.

Greetings,
  Michael



‐‐‐‐‐‐‐ Original Message ‐‐‐‐‐‐‐
Am Montag, Oktober 14, 2019 3:13 PM schrieb Ian Darwin <i...@darwinsys.com>:

> There are several reasons that sqlite is called 'lite'. One is that it is 
> extremely light on SQL standards conformance.
> It allows (I assume deliberately) many lax interpretations, in aid of getting 
> the job done.
>
> If you try this on a real SQL database like postgresql in ports, the inverted 
> form fails:
>
> website=# select * from product where 'http%' like url;
> (0 rows)
>
> website=# select * from product where url like 'http%';
> (100 rows)
>
> Clearly that doesn't matter in the case where sqlite is the only possible 
> database, but since people may read
> your post by doing a web search on 'sql like' and be deceived into thinking 
> you were talking about sql databases,
> I wanted to not leave readers of the list with an incorrect impression.
>
> > Hello Giovanni,
> > I just gave it a try. The order of the operands of the LIKE operator 
> > doesn't make any difference. I just tested it manually against my sqlite 
> > database. The returned results are identical.
> >
> > > On 10/12/19 4:46 PM, y38...@protonmail.com wrote:
> > >
> > > > SELECT (username||'@'||domain) FROM users WHERE ? LIKE mailbox
> > >
> > > I think it should read
> > > SELECT (username||'@'||domain) FROM users WHERE mailbox LIKE ?
> > > typo or error ?
> > > Giovanni



Reply via email to