> What do you mean by "confronting on an infrastructure level" and
> "liberating the infrastructure"? Sure, one thing is to understand the

1. Requiring equal access to switches and fiber. Like cities (most so far) cannot have private streets, and like Ma Bell was forced to provide phone service to everyone, and anyone was able to call anyone, everyone should be able to route and receive arbitrary packets. Not necessarily for free, but comparable to lifeline phone service cost.

2. Dispensing with asymmetric protocols that prevent addressability of most of end users, leaving them at the mercy of 'providers'. IPv6 was supposed to fix this, but it was properly subverted.

3. Mandate data storage at the edge. It has absolutely nothing to do with backups and availability - those are blatant lies. It's only about the power. These days Internet users are in the similar position as migrant workers, where the boss confiscates passports for 'safekeeping'.

and so on.

Those are the invisible chains. Without infrastructure changes the effects of activism are limited to calling the boss names.

With (some of) the above implemented MAGAf cannot continue to exist. Their existence is predicated on very material substrate, which is outside the allowed discourse.

> Yasha Levine's new book, Surveillance Valley, does a very good job at
> this, basically relating advertisement as the business model of the
> present, to counter-insurgency as defined since the 1960s. They are both


I just started reading it, so far it has one important quality: it's factual.


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