Hi everyone,

After originally hearing that soft song, I too thought that there was 
something not quite right about the timbre of the song in order for it 
to be a full out White-eyed Vireo. Hearing an Am. Robin in the 
background, singing an early dawn song, I thought about other birds that 
might have become active and which might possibly be able to mimic a W-e 
Vireo. One that came to mind was Blue-gray Gnatcatcher. I've often heard 
them whisper quiet imitations of other species, after pishing them in.

But, now that Marshall mentions Ovenbird flight song, that makes total 
sense. I've certainly heard Ovenbird flight song containing snippets of 
Red-eyed Vireo in them. I have to concur with that suggestion. Thoughts? 
Others?

Marshall, my understanding is that these were detections grabbed 
real-time, with three seconds of padding added to each detection. So, 
unless there were multiple back-to-back detections, there probably isn't 
a continuous recording data set. Is this correct, Steve?

Thanks!

Sincerely,
Chris T-H

Marshall J. Iliff wrote:
>
> All,
>
>  
>
> I had been privy to this clip earlier when there were internal 
> discussions about it within Cornell. Perhaps I should have chimed in 
> then, when the group was smaller and the chance at sounding foolish 
> lessened, but I'll go ahead a stick my neck out now, ready to be 
> guillotined by the rest of the group.
>
>  
>
> This doesn't quite sound right for White-eyed Vireo to me. I listened 
> to it a bunch of times and was never convinced that it wasn't the tail 
> segment of an Ovenbird flight song. The beginning seems to wavering 
> and not explosive enough and the end of the song does not have the 
> abrupt chip that White-eyed almost always has. It sounds like this 
> song may have been picked up in the middle---Steve do you have a 
> longer cut including the 5 seconds before this clip? I'll admit to 
> some amount of bias that I think White-eyed Vireo is an unlikely 
> migrant to hear singing in flight AND even less likely to be recorded 
> in Ithaca, versus somewhere in their regular breeding range. But part 
> of why this NFC stuff is so interesting is that it can challenge our 
> ground-based assumptions.
>
>  
>
> Any thoughts on the possibility of the tail end of Ovenbird flight 
> song as an alternate ID?
>
>  
>
> Best,
>
>  
>
> Marshall
>
>  
>
> -- 
>
> -------------------------------------------------
> Marshall J. Iliff
> West Roxbury, MA
> miliff AT aol.com
> -------------------------------------------------
> eBird/AKN Project Leader
> Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> 159 Sapsucker Woods Rd.
> Ithaca, NY 14850
> http://www.ebird.org
> http://www.avianknowledge.net
> -------------------------------------------------
>
>  
>
> *From:* bounce-3871476-9667...@list.cornell.edu 
> [mailto:bounce-3871476-9667...@list.cornell.edu] *On Behalf Of *Chris 
> Tessaglia-Hymes
> *Sent:* Thursday, April 30, 2009 2:48 PM
> *To:* nfc-l@cornell.edu
> *Subject:* [nfc-l] [Fwd: Re: vireo]
>
>  
>
> Here's an interesting singer from Steve Kelling's place the other 
> morning, using his flowerpot microphone setup....
> Sincerely,
> Chris T-H
>
>
> -------- Original Message --------
>
> *Subject: *
>
>       
>
> Re: vireo
>
> *Date: *
>
>       
>
> Thu, 30 Apr 2009 12:54:26 -0400
>
> *From: *
>
>       
>
> Steve Kelling <s...@cornell.edu> <mailto:s...@cornell.edu>
>
> *To: *
>
>       
>
> c...@cornell.edu <mailto:c...@cornell.edu>
>
> *References: *
>
>       
>
> <49f9c444.6080...@cornell.edu> <mailto:49f9c444.6080...@cornell.edu> 
> <49f9cc01.6040...@cornell.edu> <mailto:49f9cc01.6040...@cornell.edu>
>
>  
>
> attached
>  
> > Steve Kelling wrote:
> >> Chris,
> >> There is what appears like the song of a White-eyed Vireo near the end.
> >> This is the old BirdCast system that I am using. I simply am linking 
> >> the 3 second clips from Birdcast into a continuous AIF file using Raven.
> >> 
> >> steve
> >> 
> > 
>  
>
>
>
> -- 
> =============================================
> Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
> TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
> Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
> 159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
> Voice: 607-254-2418, FAX: 607-254-2460
> http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp mailto:c...@cornell.edu
> =============================================

-- 
=============================================
Christopher T. Tessaglia-Hymes
TARU Product Line Manager and Field Applications Engineer
Bioacoustics Research Program, Cornell Lab of Ornithology
159 Sapsucker Woods Road, Ithaca, New York 14850
Voice: 607-254-2418, FAX: 607-254-2460
http://www.birds.cornell.edu/brp mailto:c...@cornell.edu
=============================================


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