Some people in the APC mailing list have said that mysql blows up at around
200-300 queries a second.

http://lists.communityconnect.com/pipermail/apc-cache/2001-April/000611.html

Phil Jackson <[EMAIL PROTECTED]> wrote in message
[EMAIL PROTECTED]">news:[EMAIL PROTECTED]...
> Some good advice already given, and I quite agree.  MySQL is no
light-weight - comparable to MS SQLServer and Oracle in performance.  Also,
running the DB on a dedicated DB server may buy some performance.  If you
must check out SQLServer, then http://www.sqlteam.com is a good place to
start.  At work we are an ASP shop, and have used Access for some
lightweight apps, but the mandate now is to use IBM's DB2 UDB product - a
DB2 database server, also, a mainframe IBM OS-390 DB2 database.  Don't know
the price tag, but they are very robust databases, if a bit quirky getting
Microsoft stuff to talk to IBM stuff...
> You could connect via the ODBC functions of PHP.
> Also try looking at http://www.4guysfromrolla.com and
http://www.asptoday.com - not trying to sell ASP - just good and varied
resources with good articles about
> databases in general can be found there in addition to asp material...
>
> Phil J.
>
>
> Doug Schasteen wrote:
>
> > I've been programming PHP w/ mysql for almost 2 years now for my
company. We develop online testing and surveying software. We are currently
running operations for a few specific companies where maybe 20-30 tests will
be taken online per day (it requires pulling the test questions out of the
database in random order, and then putting all of their answers into the
database at the end of the test.) This is currently running on a shared
webserver using php3 and mysql. Recently we've been talking about some
projects that will require a lot more use. (Could be 100 people taking a
test at once or it could be 1000 people taking a test at once. We don't know
yet.)
> >
> > If anyone has had some experience with upgrading as your operations
grow, I'd appreciate if you could answer ANY of the following questions:
> >
> > 1. At what point will mysql blow up (how many tests could be taken at
once? How many rows of results could be stored in a table before it bogs
down?)
> >
> > 2. At what point will we need a dedicated server instead of
shared-hosting?
> >
> > 3. How fast of a server do we need? Will a 1ghz server outperform a
500mhz server when using apache-php-mysql?
> >
> > 4. If we need a new database, what is the next step above mysql? I have
some experience with Oracle but it is too expensive. Is there anything
inbetween that is friendly to PHP?
> >
> > 5. If MS-SQL is an option for a database-upgrade. What are the
implications of switching our server to a win32-based server? Will we have
problems with PHP on windows when all of our scripts were programmed for
unix?
> >
> > I realize these are a lot of questions and that we probably need some
consulting work done, but if any of you could share your knowledge on any
one of those topics I would really appreciate it. I just need something to
give me a head start in my research. Point me in the right direction!
> >
> > - Doug Schasteen
> >   [EMAIL PROTECTED]
> >
> > P.S. - if you know of any good articles online that compare different
servers or databases please share.
>
>
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